r/me_irl Jul 01 '22 Helpful 5 Silver 1

me_irl

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50.4k Upvotes

1.1k

u/DubiousHistory Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 02 '22

A letter from Mendel was found in Darwin's possession, but he probably never read it.

EDIT: This is in front of his monastery right now.

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u/Hesaysithurts Jul 01 '22 Wholesome

That’s one of those things that I sometimes find my self thinking about. It was so close. So close.

Just imagine if Darwin had just opened that bloody letter. Imagine what he could have felt if he had read it. The conclusions he could have drawn, the satisfaction from understanding the basis of his own research so much better.

I understand why he didn’t feel an urge to open yet another letter from a church-person, I can imagine they usually weren’t very supporting or interesting to read. But the missed opportunity. That’s a huge opportunity to miss out on.

And the potential consequences for science. It just boggles my mind. It was right there, probably in his hand at least once. And he didn’t read it. One of the big what if moments in history.

Perhaps it would have been even better if Mendel had sent the letter to Alfred Russel Wallace though. He might have actually opened it. And Wallace really got the short end of the stick in all of this. He independently figured out the same thing as Darwin, but has gotten very little cred for it. He deserved better, and with the knowledge from Mendel he might have gotten it.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Russel_Wallace

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u/iheartalpacas Jul 01 '22

Is there an ELI5 for this?

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u/XL_Panda Jul 01 '22

Darwin theorised evolution based on fossils and historical lineages (shared features between different animals, etc.) While Mendel proved inheritance happened through genes (by breeding peas).

If their theories/paths had converged, we might have had lots more insights to gain from these 2 minds :)

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u/Kawawaymog Jul 01 '22

It’s so funny / interesting to me that we had to figure out inheritance happens and evolution works after taking advantage of it for thousands of years.

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u/ffyugder57 Jul 01 '22

Wanna make it even funnier?

Crocs have been around longer, like a lot longer. They still haven't figured it out.

Stupid fucking crocogators.

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u/Arikaido777 Jul 01 '22

🧔🏻‍♂️ - you still don’t have a theory of evolution

🐊 -haha death roll go brrrrrr

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u/Rasbold Jul 01 '22

Crocs: we like things that end with "ll"

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u/Baron11704 Jul 01 '22

Not to mention, creationists like to use Darwin’s (somewhat inaccurate model that has been improved since its publication) as the prevailing model of evolution, acting like scientists use and support Darwin’s original unaltered theory because everyone knows his name, before pointing out all its flaws (and none of how we’ve changed those flaws to better reflect the evidence) to “prove” that the modern theory of evolution is false. If Darwin had worked together with Mendel and formed a more complete theory, creationists wouldn’t be so easily able to create this strawman argument, because there wouldn’t be so many flaws in Darwin’s original theory.

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u/saluksic Jul 02 '22

People operating on bad faith will always come up with excuses. Young Earth has been definitively proven false, there isn’t anything more that could be done.

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u/iheartalpacas Jul 01 '22

Muchas gracias

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u/Sunoutlaw Jul 02 '22

Thank you!

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u/mondi93 Jul 01 '22

Do we know what was written in the letter?

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u/Hesaysithurts Jul 01 '22

I honestly haven’t looked it up, but it’s probably out there somewhere.
It’s also not entirely unlikely that Darwin did know about Mendel’s work and was just too pigheaded to accept the novel hypothesis. I just prefer to think that he missed the opportunity by chance rather than by lack of understanding its importance.

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u/jthanny Jul 01 '22

Or he just didn't have the same drive to eat peas as he did to eat all the exotic animals he discovered.

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u/LetheArdor Jul 01 '22

He said Darwin, have you heard about peas?

Peas nuts.

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u/konstantinua00 Jul 01 '22

how would Darwin know that was a church person?

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u/Shasan23 Jul 01 '22

The letter was posted: "from catholic monk Gregor mendel"

Jk but maybe

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u/Ok_Chocolate2552 Jul 01 '22

Especially when Alfred Russel Wallace honored Darwin and his discoveries after naming his text “Darwinism”!

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u/susses Jul 01 '22

Wait you're mendel?!

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u/garrettj100 Jul 01 '22

Am I a MENDEL

Or am I MUPPET?

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u/Emhyr-Deithwen Jul 01 '22

And Mendel was Catholic priest as well... Kinda checkmate creationists

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u/WelleErdbeer Jul 01 '22 Silver

I don't believe in god but if I did I'd see no reason why he wouldn't automate as much as possible. He's supposed to be all powerful, not inefficiently stupid.

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u/DarkflowNZ Jul 01 '22

My physics teacher in high school was a Christian of some denomination or another if I recall. He viewed science as essentially the study of god's work and not at all at odds with his existence. I'm not a god type person but that makes the most sense to me

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u/GrizNectar Jul 01 '22

This is basically the official stance of the Catholic Church as well. A lot of followers choose otherwise tho lol

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u/my-name-is-puddles Jul 01 '22

The Catholic Church explicitly leaves it up to an individual whether they want to believe everything was made in 6 days or whatever, or whether they believe in Evolution. But basically as long as you include God in there somehow, they've been A-okay with evolution since 1950.

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u/Omni1012 Jul 01 '22

As I’ve been taught I think it was something along the lines of “a day in the lords eye is one thousand years in the eye of man” which still isn’t long enough but I’ve also been taught the the Bible probably has mistranslations and insertions from rich folk who want more control.

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u/Calaquendorite Jul 01 '22

If there was a God of Micromanagement I'm sure it would be one of the evil ones

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u/americanpie318 Jul 01 '22

The god of micro management was my last boss. He was an evil one, can confirm.

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u/RedAIienCircle Jul 01 '22

We had the same boss?

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u/Kiyasa Jul 01 '22

he appears in many forms.

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u/No-Newspaper-7693 Jul 01 '22

That's probably a good writing prompt. A God that micromanages everything and because of the butterfly effect, everything he micromanages gets worse over time than if he had left it alone.

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u/KeepWhatYouKill Jul 01 '22

The devil is in the details

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u/OrmanRedwood Jul 01 '22

The fact that this is true is also a good reason why God doesn't tell everyone exactly what they are supposed to do with their life in a big booming voice with an accompanying company of angels.

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u/AchtzehnVonSchwefel Jul 01 '22

You're talking about HOI4 YouTubers.

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u/ku200000 Jul 01 '22 Eureka!

That's my gripe with most Bible thumpers. I'm not going to tell an ant the chemical component of cement. I will just tell the ant that his wish is granted and now he has a bridge.

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u/Redgen87 Jul 01 '22

I do believe and I also agree with you for the most part. That a large percentage is automated. I mean he knows what is gonna happen right, may as well create in a way where the path leads to the goal.

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u/brief_blurb Jul 01 '22

I’m Catholic and that’s sort of how I see it. God is being itself, the universe is a sort of machine made by God that functions in a specific way. Science is the study of how that machine functions. Religion is the study of what man should do about that.

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u/EthanielRain Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

Would efficiency be a consideration for an all-powerful being though?

I personally like religious leaders saying something like "science is just revealing God's method"

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u/McAUTS Jul 01 '22

Yeah, all powerful but definitely not that intelligent. ;-) That god made a lot of mistakes.

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u/Privatdozent Jul 01 '22

IMO that sense that they made mistakes and is unintelligent is just a reflection of our own confusion about a reality full of elements we ourselves havent integrated and understand. I say that as a disbeliever, considering a hypothetical god who set up the intricate dominoes.

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u/DeepDreamIt Jul 01 '22

Are genetically inherited diseases intentional then? It seems like if he was creating everything, he could have very easily just made it so there wouldn’t be genetic diseases, transcription errors in DNA that cause genetic diseases, etc.

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u/ImprovementContinues Jul 01 '22

Unfortunately, transcription errors in DNA are also what drives evolution. Those same mutations can be beneficial, harmful, or even fatal, but without the first category, you don't have evolution.

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u/DeepDreamIt Jul 01 '22

I understand, and thought of that while I was typing, but I guess it goes back to what I was saying, that a being who could create a universe could have easily decided there will be the randomness thrown in, it just won't affect in a negative way the people who it was all supposedly created for. How would randomness be coded but not allow for "negative" consequences for one species? I'm not sure off the top of my head, but something that could create an entire universe would almost certainly be able to figure it out

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u/HappensALot Jul 01 '22

You are assuming the things we view as negative are also viewed by God as negative.

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u/ImprovementContinues Jul 01 '22

I mean, you're right.

How would randomness be coded but not allow for "negative" consequences for one species?

Literally not possible...

something that could create an entire universe would almost certainly be able to figure it out

...for me. But yeah, something that is omniscient should be able to figure out a way. Or use something that is pseudorandom, IE looks like random chance, but is actually a predetermined sequence of results to avoid the bad ones.

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u/hilldo75 Jul 01 '22

Those happen because Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit. Everything bad is the result of that first sin. If they never ate the fruit it would still just be only those two in the garden of Eden being healthy and immortal. At least that is what I hear told when people ask the bible thumpers, it's the ultimate excuse for why god is nothing but good and all the bad is a form of punishment from something that happened generations ago.

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u/Saiyan-solar Jul 01 '22

Ever since medieval times the one doing the science have always been priests and monks that dedicate their entire life on finding out how the "world of God functioned" so they would be able to better understand God's creation.

The science vs religion thing is only pretty recent as scientific evidence deviated further and further from learning to better praise God to learning how the world really worked. Eventually people start explaining phenomenon that were previous just accepted as divine miracles and started to debunk the divine more and more.

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u/All_Lives_Matter420 Jul 01 '22

There's absolutely no reason science and religion have to contradict one another

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u/sneakymanlance Jul 01 '22

Many Christians believe the Earth is only ~6,000 years old.

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u/LadyRimouski Jul 01 '22

Many people are morons. Some of them are Christian.

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u/theanimation Jul 01 '22

But they don't have to believe that. Many understand that the Bible isn't a science book.

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u/Bart_The_Chonk Jul 01 '22

It's only taken literally when it confirms a person's world view. Otherwise it's symbolic and used to confirm a person's world view.

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u/IndianaFartJockey Jul 01 '22

Oh my. The convenience of such a magic tome! It can shift from the literal to the figurative with the slightest effort.

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u/kthxqapla Jul 01 '22

welcome to critical theory

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u/SKTwenty Jul 01 '22

My mother thinks dinosaurs are fake because they're not in the bible

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22

I'll bet you're not in the bible...

Just sayin' ... checkmate, mom.

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u/possibly-a-pineapple Jul 01 '22

Every Christian who does believe that is one too much

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u/HoosierBeenJammin Jul 01 '22

I don’t see how that belief is foundational to that faith though.

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u/hilldo75 Jul 01 '22

The old testament spells it out that Adam lived so long and had Seth at x amount of years old, and Seth lived so long and had blah at x amount years old and on and on. Eventually they get to someone real from history we can cross reference from Babylonian records. I can't remember all the details because it's been a few years but it could probably be googled easily.

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u/Ossius Jul 01 '22

A good friend of mine convinced me out of the young earth theory many many years ago when he said often genealogical in history only listed people of note and weren't an exact record. Its more like saying "Descendant of Joan of Arc, Napoleon Buonaparte, etc" (Not that they are related just an example). You don't get Napoleon's grand father listed, he did nothing important. You just draw a line through fame.

So in that frame you can say that the genealogy of christ was probably a lot longer but not worth/able to list out every single name from Adam to Christ.

It could be a bunch of bullshit but it started me down the path that I shouldn't take the bible at face value when you can interpret it through a historical lens.

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u/jsmith4567 Jul 01 '22

With the genealogies the bible uses the cultural conventions of the time. That includes calling any male ancestor a father. Men having multiple names, and legal adoption or fatherhood.

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u/qlokas1 Jul 01 '22

If one piece is wrong, then another, then another, what good is that book? Are you oroposing we cherry pick stuff from the bible to rationalise religion?

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u/ShrUmie Jul 01 '22

When I was a kid I realized that the 6 days didn’t mean ‘earth days’ because it was describing the formation of planets and stars. And the first days happened even before earth had a sun. Some people got mad at me for saying that someone outside the universe probably didn’t run on a 24hr clock.

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Master-Town1616 Jul 01 '22

But they do, and have done so for a long time already. That is the entire point most creationists don't get.

If you are specific enough in how the world works, and what you require of people, then you are going to be fact checked by facts and science.

I have little problems with vague ideas about there being "something" more. I very much do have a problem with specific rules on how to live, because people say they KNOW what is out there, and they KNOW what it wants us to do.

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u/gerrta_hard Jul 01 '22

There's absolutely no reason science and religion have to contradict one another

The contradiction is what separates them. A logically consistent religion is science.

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u/lfmantra Jul 01 '22

Very hard disagree. Science has already contradicted every religion in existence in thousands of ways.

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u/Silkroad202 Jul 01 '22

An Omnipotent, omniscient, Omni-benevolent being cannot have created a world with so much despair, suffering and ignorance. It is an instant contradiction that I do not believe can be overcome to allow both to occur.

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u/theanimation Jul 01 '22

None of what you said has to do with science.

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u/gluteusmaximus753 Jul 01 '22

Wow bro you just destroyed thousands of years of theology. Why hasn't anyone before you thought about that? You should tell the vatican about your groundbreaking discovery.

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u/Privatdozent Jul 01 '22

An omnipotent, omniscient god, even an omnibenevolent one, would require far more than instant logic to understand. Consider that horrors and ignorance are inextricably tied to beauty love and understanding. And if our time here is literally the equivalent of zero time when considering eternity, our judgements of what is senseless cosmically makes even less sense.

I say this as a complete nonbeliever. It would make sense that we, as far from omniscient beings, would be perplexed by it. Even the dismissiveness that some of us would have in considering it would work well with the staggeringly complex nature of the machine.

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u/hivemindwar Jul 01 '22

Religion doesn't necessarily imply an omnipotent being.

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u/headamputator Jul 01 '22

who made you the judge

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u/SerBron Jul 01 '22

I strongly disagree, by definition they work in a completely opposite way. Religion is about blindly believing in one or several supernatural phenomenon, without a single proof. Science is about believing in what we can experiment, observe, analyze, and most importantly, replicate. One asks you to let go of logic and common sense for the sake of being faithful, the other wants to give you real answers backed up with evidence.

If you meant that believing in god is not incompatible with trusting science, I kind of agree. Problem is that virtually every single religion on this planet wants you to believe in some fabricated tale. Jesus came back from the dead? Science says it's impossible. Moses manipulated water to divide a fucking sea? Never happened, and never will. Noah got every single species on a single boat ? Literally undoable under any circumstances.

Once you start basing your whole life and values on some ancient book full of unbelievable stories, there's a high chance that you will be against anything that refutes your beliefs.

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u/Aimako Jul 01 '22

That’s misleading and false. The science vs religion was never a ‘ pretty recent ‘ phenomenon. Have you ever heard of Galileo Galileo? In 1616, he was put on trial by the Catholic Church so he can stop discussing ideas that conflicted the teachings of the Catholic Church.

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u/OrneryOneironaut Jul 01 '22

Yeah they really seemed to get their shit together for a couple centuries after that Galileo PR kerfuffle

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u/Johannes0511 Jul 01 '22

The whole Galileo affair was more about him being a huge dick anyways.

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u/xingrubicon Jul 01 '22

Was it really? Ive never heard that. Can you point me towards a source for that?

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u/reximus123 Jul 01 '22

http://galileo.rice.edu/gal/urban.html

Basically the pope told Galileo it was cool to publish his theory even if it contradicted the prevailing theory of the time and he would back him up but then Galileo created a stupid character modeled after the pope named Simplicio. The pope wasn’t happy about this and since Galileo already had a bunch of powerful enemies who wanted him gone they were able to convince the pope to prosecute him.

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u/xingrubicon Jul 01 '22

Thanks for the info, i had no idea. That really changes the narrative abouy this part of history.

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u/Atomdude Jul 01 '22

Maybe this entry is not the best source, but an interesting read, nonetheless.

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u/Subli-minal Jul 01 '22

Because his evidence was undeniable and the church basically had to admit it had been misinterpreting fundamental things about their god’s creation and set out to get it right the next time.

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u/DHisfakebaseball Jul 01 '22

Because his evidence was undeniable

A big part of the controversy between Galileo and the Church was the fact that there were holes and errors in his heliocentric model. The size and distances that he calculated for the stars should have created obvious stellar parallax, for example. He glossed over details, ignored evidence that didn't fit his theories, and ridiculed anybody who disagreed with him—including the Pope, who had actually been sympathetic to his ideas. I'm not defending the Church, and it massively abused its power in condemning a political enemy for heresy and sentencing him to house arrest, but Galileo was not a paragon of scientific rigour to say the least.

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u/Dave-1066 Jul 01 '22

It’s also worth pointing out that Galileo’s run-in with Church authorities didn’t remotely damage his belief in the existence of God. That was never an issue for him. Just as Newton (quite easily one of the most intelligent humans in history) regarded God’s existence as self-evident.

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u/LadyRimouski Jul 01 '22

Pascal, too.

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u/Benign_Banjo Jul 01 '22

Ah, I love ol' pressure guy

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u/OrneryOneironaut Jul 01 '22

And Descartes

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u/EnigmaticQuote Jul 01 '22

That's what they get for hoarding wealth and literature. A bunch of well read monks who understand science of the time.

Not super surprising the religious scholars have had some contributions to science.

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u/SquareWet Jul 01 '22

Who would have thought the key to increasing ignorance was to make all human information easily and instantly available at the tip of everyone’s fingers.

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u/EnigmaticQuote Jul 01 '22

Much harder to understand a research paper than a Facebook feed or 24/7 rage bait news.

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u/SquareWet Jul 01 '22

People don’t realize that the educational gap between a kid entering middle school and a high school graduate is the same as a high school graduate and a PhD holder yet alone that the PhD ladder is exponentially more intense. They sincerely believe that their 27 minutes of “researching” chat groups puts them on par with a doctor as if they would have ever given any gravitas to the scientific opinion of a middle schooler when they were 18.

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u/LadyRimouski Jul 01 '22

Meh. I don't feel significantly smarter now than I was at 18. More widely read, yes. Wiser, I hope. But my ability to comprehend new information has not changed significantly.

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u/JazzPigeon Jul 01 '22

Whaaat, naw, Man Catholics aren't Christian.

(Heard this literally several times from a dude I worked with daily until very recently)

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u/DawgFighterz Jul 01 '22

The KKK and majority of Evangelicals are anti Catholic and consider it a satanic cannibal cult.

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u/afpow Jul 01 '22

Probably because The Vatican is relatively progressive on matters of evolution and the universe compared to the Christian Taliban.

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u/DawgFighterz Jul 01 '22

Catholics were one of the first people to petition for the abolition of slavery (after the slaves themselves obviously)

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u/ivanacco1 Jul 01 '22

Yeah and the Spanish monks that came to the Americas to spread Christianity were horrified by the forced work and even at one point the spanish kings completely outlawed the encomienda system (but of course they ignored it completely).

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u/LadyRimouski Jul 01 '22

It's older than that. It has to do with "sola scriptura" vs. following the pope. Americans don't like being told what to do. See: the masking disaster.

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u/alternaivitas Jul 01 '22

Catholics are Christians

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u/JazzPigeon Jul 01 '22

Yeah, I'm well aware.

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u/Ek-Ulfhednar Jul 01 '22

Just very fancy Christians

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u/TheLegendJohnSnow Jul 01 '22

We drink our alcohol with the pinky up

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u/Schneebrunzer86 Jul 01 '22

Out of necessity though. He couldn't finance his academic studies and went to become a monk

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u/Pete_Booty_Judge Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

So was the guy who came up with the Big Bang Theory. Issac Newton was a super hardcore Catholic Christian (well I suppose most people were in those days, but Newton did seem to take it to a new level) who was extremely proud of his lifelong virginity.

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u/TryingToBeUnabrasive Jul 01 '22

So was the guy who came up with the Big Bang Theory.

Georges LeMaître was his name!

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u/federvieh1349 Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

Isaac Newton was most definitely not a Catholic, let alone hardcore.

Edit: Oh, and also that Big Bang thing.. this is just a troll account I suppose.

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u/s-sea Jul 01 '22

Georges Lemaître, the inventor of the Big Bang theory, was a Catholic priest.

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u/Dave-1066 Jul 01 '22

Correct, not a Catholic, but profoundly deist and utterly certain of God’s existence. He regarded atheism as a form of stupidity.

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u/IceCreamBoy333 Jul 01 '22

So just a regular virgin like everyone here?

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u/LadyRimouski Jul 01 '22

He was just one of a number of amazing scientists who found inspiration for their science in their faith and vice versa.

I aim to follow after them in my own small way.

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u/citydreef Jul 01 '22

Yes but only because he was too poor to go to university.

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u/SirRandyMarsh Jul 01 '22

he was a Jesuit

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u/Guess_whois_back Jul 01 '22

I'm not religious but if you think about it, creating lifeforms that can iteratively adapt themselves to their environment is just good design. If natural selection wasn't a thing we wouldn't have dogs and the slightest change in climate or new disease would just wipe us all out.

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u/Fragrant-Airport1309 Jul 01 '22

Big bang theory also created by a Catholic priest.

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u/weary_cursor Jul 01 '22

woah, paying attention in science class paid off, now I can understand dumb memes on reddit!

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u/Rafaelow Jul 01 '22

Please explain i never received an education. Like I went to school and everything but just forgot to pay attention

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u/weary_cursor Jul 01 '22

I hope I don't fuck this up but basically Gregor was this monk that researched peas and through breeding them discovered the laws of inheritance or something i think

Yeah I'm v smart ik no need to thank me

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u/prokseus Jul 01 '22

If I remember correctly. He basically discovered the probability which trait you get from your parents. Mendel was quite lucky he chose pea's traits that are on different chromosomes so there was no crossing-over. He later tried duplicate his survey but he chose another plant, which has these genes in same chromosome. The results weren't same so he abandoned this theory and his notes were later found after his death.

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u/DrewTheMaster Jul 01 '22

Mucho smart , nice

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u/SpinalFluidDrinker Jul 01 '22

Yeah and now we have to use punnet squares in biology to find out the genotype of an organism

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u/Intricate_Potato Jul 01 '22

Gregor Mendel was a monk that discovered how we inherit traits by cross breeding (don't know if cross breeding is the correct term) peas. He made a table that could predict the probability of which traits that a person's child may inherit, it may still be used today (I'm not sure). He is known as the father of genetics.

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u/punjabface Jul 01 '22

Gregor box method has saved me in many situations

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u/VanillaGorilla02 Jul 01 '22

Really? Name one...

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u/AGE_OF_HUMILIATION Jul 01 '22

Biology test

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u/RedAIienCircle Jul 01 '22

Ok, name a second...

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u/Diamondgrn Jul 01 '22

Biology test's mums

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u/YouAreInAComaWakeUp Jul 01 '22

Second biology test

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u/Just_Spade Jul 01 '22

Dihybrid cross question at the end of a genetics exam

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u/DiceUwU_ Jul 01 '22

That one time a guy pointed a gun to my head an said "what's the gregor box method" for example.

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u/TheBaggyActuality Jul 01 '22

The Punnett square saved me a lot too!

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u/breastronaut Jul 01 '22

It's a shame just about the only outwardly observable human genetic traits that conform neatly to Punnet squares are attached earlobes and wet vs dry earwax. The rest are way too damn complicated.

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u/sassrocks Jul 01 '22

The only math I ever understood on the first try

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u/JhonnyHopkins Jul 01 '22

//A+a=Aa// YAAAAYYYY

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u/noob4now Jul 01 '22

Now I just vividly imagine your first class teacher screaming at you that “1+1 is not fucking 11!!!!!”

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u/VanillaGorilla02 Jul 01 '22

God speed my friend...

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u/goodmandan111 Jul 01 '22

I got "some" and "fucking" mixed up and I thought some dude named Greg went around fucking peas.

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u/Exodius5 actually me irl Jul 01 '22

well he wasn’t himself fucking the peas but more like making the peas fuck each other

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u/awesomehippie12 Jul 01 '22

If you take pollen from one plant and put it on another, aren't you the one fucking the peas?

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u/Exodius5 actually me irl Jul 01 '22

i ain’t fuckingn no god damn plant watch yo tone

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u/morphinee Jul 01 '22

No that’s make you a. Pollinator….

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u/izerth Jul 01 '22

So Mendel was like a pea incubus.

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u/bigboybeeperbelly Jul 01 '22

And then making up the data to fit his theory. Turned out to be right though so we give him a pass

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u/RedAIienCircle Jul 01 '22

Which is not much different from Scientists today, else P hacking wouldn't be a problem.

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u/_shaggyrodgers Jul 01 '22

kid named some

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u/iRollGod Jul 01 '22

How on earth does this fit in r/me_irl..?

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u/NinjaN-SWE Jul 01 '22

Shouldn't this be on /r/danksciencememes ?

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u/MispelledCurtain Jul 01 '22

every day r/me_irl slowly becomes less meirl

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u/skkkkkt Jul 01 '22

He was a clergy right?

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u/mysliceofthepie Jul 01 '22

A Catholic priest, specifically an Augustinian friar.

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u/Tricklash Jul 01 '22

Fun fact: the species Mendel used is called "pisello odoroso" in Italian, which translates roughly to "smelly dick".

Science class is in middle school usually.

You can fill in the blanks.

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u/slagodactyl Jul 01 '22

What do you mean science class is in middle school usually? Did you not have science in elementary and high school???

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u/roachwarrior Jul 01 '22

Apparently he did write his findings to Darwin, but he never actually saw the letter. I bet he'd have been all over it like a pair of recessive alleles

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u/FenderRoy has immunity Jul 01 '22

I am confused

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u/Willdabeast314 Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22 Silver

Gregor Mendel was a scientist, or I guess they would have called him a natural philosopher, who among other things, discovered how inherited traits are passed down. He didn’t figure out the mechanism by which those traits were passed down, but he developed a model used to predict the likelihood of a child inheriting certain traits to this day.

Edit: clarity

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u/beef5162real Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

His model isn't really used to this day, at least not in most serious contexts, as there are a number of factors which complicate it. It's actually been shown to be statistically likely that he fiddled his numbers to make them look better and fit his model since other processes, such as crossing over, mean that a strict Mendelian model of inheritance doesn't work. He was certainly very close to the truth though, especially for the time.

Edit: read top reply for clarification

Edit 2: a better wording of my original point - We don't use the same model as Mendel, however the model we use produces the same results as Mendel's model a vast majority of the time.

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u/The_Heck_Reaction Jul 01 '22

This is not true! Alleles with complete dominance always show a 3:1 inheritance pattern. Second crossing over only affects genes nearby on the same chromosome. If two genes are on different chromosomes or are far enough apart on the same chromosome they will show Mendel’s 9:3:3:1 pattern. Source - My PhD in genetics.

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u/AtariAlchemist Jul 01 '22

How DARE you bring experience and qualified, expert knowledge into this!

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u/Pete_Booty_Judge Jul 01 '22

Ok, thanks, I was about to post that the guy above was full of shit. I don’t use as much biology/biochem these days but had postgraduate level genetics and immunology courses in the not so distant past and that post seemed like bullshit to me.

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u/Frenchymemez Jul 01 '22

I agree. Source - I went to school, so I was taught this shit at like 14 (Plus I'm studying biomedicine with a focus in genetics)

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u/I_like_frozen_grapes Jul 01 '22

Yeah but even alleles on different chromosomes can be inherited together if they are linked via interchromosomal linkage ropes.

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u/beef5162real Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

Ah, fair enough, I suppose I was just being overly pedantic, I imagine modern uses like that as using 'another model that overlaps with Mendel's model but covers more edge cases'

Kind of like how Newton's model of gravity is incomplete, but produces a very close to correct result the vast majority of the time.

Edit - perhaps a better way of wording it is this: We don't use the same model as Mendel, however the model we use produces the same results as Mendel's model a vast majority of the time

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u/EUmoriotorio Jul 01 '22

Yeah, being pendantic about these models that have already survived the test of time is just asking for someone to come in on you. We dont hear about the hundreds of non-remembered models in middle school science.

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u/lit1337 Jul 01 '22

Father of genetics

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u/RelaksFlo Jul 01 '22

The most intelligent meme i saw yet

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u/utterlyforgetful55 Jul 01 '22

Truly agree! The best science meme I've ever seen!

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u/BBjilipi Jul 01 '22

Until you realise Mendel and Darwin, despite being contemporaries, never thought the other's work relevant to his own, and thus the meme is technically flawed since Mendel developed his work not as a response to vindicate Darwin's theory in contemporary times, but completely independently. Had the meme used 'biologists almost a century later' instead of 'contemporary', it would have been closer to the truth. You are welcome for your daily dose of pedantry, I will take my leave now.

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u/tocara1032 Jul 01 '22

So which one is you_irl???

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u/pasianluv76 Jul 01 '22

Gregor being a monk as well!

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u/wananoo Jul 01 '22

Lamarck: E X P A N D

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u/xXxBig_PoppaxXx Jul 01 '22

Homeboy spent his entire life breeding peas to find out how genetics work

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u/SwarK01 Jul 01 '22

What does it have to do with you?

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u/badhershey Jul 01 '22

Good meme. Not sure what is me_irl about this. But damn good meme.

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u/seastone008 Jul 01 '22

Gregor Mendel was a Catholic priest ❣️

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u/SnasSn Jul 01 '22

Lysenko: That evidence can't stop me because I can't read.

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u/SightsNSilencers Jul 01 '22

Man, The Muppets was so good.

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u/carpeson Jul 01 '22

In this picture Gregor isn't looking at the camera since he dies without ever hearing about Darwin. Unfortunately.

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u/TheBestNarcissist Jul 01 '22

I for one welcome our new science meme overlords

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u/Blank_Two Jul 01 '22

Gregor Mendel, the pea pimp

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u/MajDaGam3r Jul 01 '22

Everybody in my biology class referred to him as papa pea lmao

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u/Peipr Jul 01 '22

*fucking some peas

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u/PyrethrumDaisy Jul 01 '22

From left field, a bulldog races in front of 'Darwin' and bites the leg of 'The Church' lady, shredding a shoe with visible brand name 'Soapy Sam'. The bulldog's nametag reads 'Thomas Henry Huxley'.

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u/tintedWindows98 Jul 01 '22

Science baby! Scientists have an unnecessary war with ignorance. The church had to apologize to Galileo for their moronic tendencies and hate. The more rights and choices you have the better off you and society are. Go to church for spiritual guidance if you need it but end it there.

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u/himimit Jul 01 '22

Mendel was literally a Catholic priest lmao

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