r/interestingasfuck Aug 13 '22 Helpful 28 Gold 3 Buff Doge 1 You Dropped This 1 Wholesome 17 Take My Energy 2 Faith In Humanity Restored 1 Helpful (Pro) 1 Silver 21 All-Seeing Upvote 2 Bless Up 1

The Health consequences of having a drinking problem /r/ALL

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35.8k Upvotes

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u/GaryPonderosa Aug 13 '22

This is what my dad looked like as he was going under for a fucking triple bypass. He refused to admit to the doctors that he had a drinking problem but his symptoms magically went away once they gave him anti-withdrawal medication.

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u/Cafrann94 Aug 13 '22

Wow, surprised they even operated when he was in that kind of state.

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u/SuperHighDeas Aug 13 '22

When they operate they just up the dose of Ativan to sedative levels. Getting them awake and off the vent safely is a bigger hurdle than the operation with patients like that.

Sometimes they’ll just keep you on the vent until you are done withdrawing simply because you could rip out your sutures mid-seizure or during a delirious spell.

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u/chuckymack Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome Take My Energy Faith In Humanity Restored Starry Heartwarming Narwhal Salute Tearing Up To The Stars Take My Power

I didn’t know you could withdraw from alcohol until I quit. Hell, I didn’t know I was addicted until I quit. I laid on my couch in my little apartment, curled up in the fetal position for days. I couldn’t watch TV because there were always beer commercials on, I was shaking uncontrollably which caused some of the worst pain I’d ever felt in my life because my muscle fibers felt like terra cotta pots rubbing against one another. I dry-heaved for most of a day after expelling every fluid I had. I didn’t even get up to smoke. I finally made it to the bathroom and had a cigarette on the john, which didn’t make me feel any better. From there I went back to the couch for another day or two until I felt good enough to take a bath — not a shower, mind you — a bath. I couldn’t stand up straight without pain.

Thirteen years later and every single person I used to party with is either dead, in jail, has substance abuse issues, or has been in jail. Not me. I even quit smoking earlier this year.

EDIT: This has completely blown up. According to medical professionals of Reddit, DO NOT DO WHAT I DID. Alcohol withdrawal can be deadly — I just got lucky. I’ll keep responding to each and every one of you. Thank you all for your support. I love you all.

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u/GiganticEgg Aug 13 '22 Gold Helpful Wholesome

Super glad you're doing okay but for anyone else reading this if you have an alcohol dependency issue please do not go cold turkey on your own. Find some help, alcohol withdrawal can and will kill you without proper treatment

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u/ledluth Aug 13 '22

Seriously. What this guy said. Go to the emergency room, and say I’m coming off of alcohol and I hear it’s really bad. Tell them how much you drink. They very well may admit you for supervised detox. It’ll keep you safe and alive.

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u/iamaliberalpausenot Aug 13 '22

I wish I had gone to the emergency room. I just roughed it for 4 days of unending nausea, vomiting, sweating, twitching, sleepless, borderline hallucinations (mostly when I was “sleeping”) I wouldn’t wish it on anyone.

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u/Schn Aug 13 '22

I had intense visual and audio hallucinations and it was... not fun. For anyone interested here is a link to what happened to me: https://www.reddit.com/r/stopdrinking/comments/txu7xl/have_any_of_you_managed_to_stop_drinking_without/i3pqhyi/

For anybody reading, please strongly consider getting treatment if you are worried about tapering properly.

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u/rci22 Aug 13 '22

Do we have any idea why the body does that? What does alcohol “provide” for the body that makes it depend so hard that if you stop cold turkey it behaves this way? Obviously stopping cold turkey causes an imbalance in something.

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u/ledluth Aug 13 '22

Alcohol is a depressant - it slows and disorganizes your brain’s neurons. Stopping alcohol suddenly is like dropping the clutch on a fully revved up engine. Too much activity, too much disorder all at once, hence seizures.

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u/-retaliation- Aug 13 '22

As well the nausea, "fluid evacuation" and profuse sweating that he was talking about, makes this significantly worse because it causes extreme dehydration, and one of the first faculties effected by dehydration is brain function.

To continue your analogy, Think dropping the clutch on a fully revving engine after you drained all the coolant out.

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u/m3t4lf0x Aug 13 '22

Not only does alcohol act on GABA receptors which slow down CNS activity, it also suppresses glutamate, which is an excitatory neurochemical. To compensate, your body produces more glutamate the longer you are dependent on alcohol.

When you suddenly stop, you have a surplus of glutamate, which excites your brain so much you can hallucinate and in the severe cases, have delirious tremens which can lead to seizures and kill you

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u/ewMichelle18 Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

My sister is an ICU nurse and she often has patients that are withdrawing from alcohol. It requires serious medical attention. Please go to a hospital if you are withdrawing or planning on withdrawing from alcohol. The symptoms are very severe and can include intense hallucinations, seizures (some which may cause death), loss of consciousness, and extreme pain.

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u/percycrackson69 Aug 13 '22

people like your sister have saved my life. more than once. the real heroes frfr. wiping someones ass for them is a big thing also. lmao so thank you to her

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u/Rosenate22 Aug 13 '22

Absolutely, Ativan for a few days will help tremors and keep the seizure activity away. IV hydration and thiamine will go a long way. And then Librium

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u/ellamaybe77 Aug 13 '22

A friend of ours, who had done a great job of hiding how much he was really drinking every day, attempted to cold-turkey quit at home and ended up having seizures and nearly dying. Thankfully his neighbor heard him pounding on the wall between seizures, looked in his window, and called 911. Saved his life. Please, reach out for help if you feel like you need to quit. Doing it cold-turkey and alone is not a safe way to quit alcohol. Bills can be paid off; if you're gone you're gone and your family, friends and loved ones would rather have you here.

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u/CorrosiveYolk Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22 Silver

The day I turned myself in to the ER, I had a seizure at home while trying to ease my withdrawals post four days of black out drinking. I knew that was it. Called my brother and requested a ride to the ER, I put my clammy hands on the countertop and just said "I'm an alcoholic, I'm going through withdrawal, I need help."

I'm three years sober now.

I communicated with my job, told them what was happening, activated my FMLA right and asked for a treatment center. I spent four days on Ativan, thankfully, before being transferred into rehab. Came out three months later and started my life.

It can be that bad. Seek medical help if you want to quit and are overdosing on alcohol. It will save your life.

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u/averaenhentai Aug 13 '22

Also every time you go through withdrawal without tapering it will be worse the next time. It's an effect called kindling. Do not assume you will be fine the second or third time you try to quit just because you were the first. It's better to keep drinking until you can get medical attention than it is to go cold turkey.

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u/JayCroghan Aug 13 '22

Not so fun fact, some emergency rooms stock beer or spirits to give people in withdrawals.

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u/chuckymack Aug 13 '22

Had I any idea of the dangers, I probably would’ve sought help. I legit didn’t know.

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u/bekahed979 Aug 13 '22

Same with my husband, he was developing DTs when he quit & it was rough. Looking back (almost 10 years!) he should have weaned.

I quit before I got physically dependent, thankfully, but quitting drinking was hard AF.

So fucking worth it, though.

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u/Seltvs Aug 13 '22

I quit cold turkey as well and it was a nightmare. Looking back I most definitely should have sought rehabilitation.

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u/GiganticEgg Aug 13 '22

Not faulting you at all, you've done exceptionally well was just in case anyone else in a similar situation was reading

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u/the_YellowRanger Aug 13 '22

Congratulations on saving yourself

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u/11340113052111609 Aug 13 '22 Gold

For me the shaking hurt the muscles in the sides of my ribs the most, I could barely lift my arms some days, the vomiting probably contributed as well. Almost 4 months sober now after 7 years of killing myself slowly, stay strong brother I and everyone else recovering has your back🙏♥️

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u/chuckymack Aug 13 '22 Silver

Oh, I’m totally fine now. Talking about this tonight made me realize I’ve now been sober for longer than I’d been drinking. I remember those withdrawals like they were yesterday, unlike many of those drunken nights. Not interested in going through that again for any reason. Ever.

And congratulations to you! Keep it up! It DOES get easier!

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u/11340113052111609 Aug 13 '22

I have definitely noticed that! I used to think about it every day now it's maybe once or twice a week. It took my fiance leaving to kick some sense into my dumb ass but I'm glad she did. She saved my life. I've already dropped from 260lbs to 215 and I hope to continue. Thanks for sharing your experience man always good to connect with a success story. Peace and love brother

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u/London_Llewellyn Aug 13 '22

Keep it up man, power to you 🙏

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u/CaptainCaveSam Aug 13 '22

And they say alcohol isn’t a hard drug. It’s one of the three B’s that’ll kill you on cold turkey withdrawal: booze, benzos, barbs

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u/chuckymack Aug 13 '22

I honestly didn’t realize I was addicted. Which is why I didn’t realize you could withdraw from it. My siblings and parents had spoken to me about it, and suggested I had a problem, but I just thought I was a good-time party boy.

I didn’t drink at work, in class, or with my child, so I didn’t see how I could be addicted. I thought I had it under control. Turns out I didn’t.

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u/CaptainCaveSam Aug 13 '22

It creeps up on you

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u/Lorenaelsalulz Aug 13 '22

This was my ex’s attitude too. As long as he went to work, he didn’t think he had a problem. Never mind that he’d show up hungover and would get blackout drunk almost everyday. Alcoholism is no joke.

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u/chuckymack Aug 13 '22

People don’t realize how dangerous it is because of how normalized it’s become within our society.

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u/Guinness Aug 13 '22

You are extremely lucky to be alive. Alcohol withdrawal can be fatal. It’s honestly better to be physically dependent on opiates than it is alcohol. Opiate withdrawal sucks. But you’ll live.

Alcohol withdrawal can easily lead to death. One of my neighbors decided to get sober one night and quit cold Turkey. They sadly passed.

If you are addicted to alcohol please seek medical treatment to stop. It’s not like other drugs.

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u/shortdaYOLO Aug 13 '22

Second this! Please seek medical assistance if you decide that you want to quit drinking alcohol. Depending on where you live in the world you will get a Thiamine shot for prophylaxis of Wernickes encephalopathy and/or some form of slow release long acting benzodiazepines to help with the withdrawal in the first week and keep you active. Often structured withdrawals are linked with psycho-/ occupational- / physiotherapy, to help keep you occupied, close to the healthcare system and provide you with an emergency net in case you need help with the underlying condition/trauma that made you more susceptible to alcoholism.

Keep in mind that success rates do not change dramatically, but your risk of permanent disability or death goes down by a lot in a medically supervised/assisted setting.

Edit: watching that state of withdrawal is just painful to me. Withdrawal does not have to and should not look like this.

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u/MyDogsNameIsBadger Aug 13 '22

Benzos such as xanax as well! Alcohol and benzos are the 2 dangerous drugs that should be monitored. Halfway house wouldn’t accept my ex until he had been off benzos for 2 weeks because they were not a detox facility. Opiates didn’t matter.

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u/derGrubler Aug 13 '22

youre the man, man congrats!

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u/Comfortable_Skin_108 Aug 13 '22

You are lucky to be alive. Alcohol and benzo withdrawals are the only 2 substances that can kill you straight up from the withdrawals only.

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u/chuckymack Aug 13 '22

HOLY CRAP. I mean, I did it, but now I feel kinda dumb.

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u/MyDogsNameIsBadger Aug 13 '22

Ultimately you made it! You should be so proud of yourself!

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u/past_his_prime Aug 13 '22

Congratulations! I'm so glad you are able to fight this beast. I lost a nephew due to this disease. It was so hard seeing him being slowly destroyed. Kudos for having the strength and determination to see it through.

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u/bellinghamcalifornia Aug 13 '22

Super proud of you, bro!

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome All-Seeing Upvote Bravo! Narwhal Salute

I just hit 1000 days alcohol free on Thursday! Just tooting my own horn.

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u/fuzzwell Aug 13 '22

I hit 1000 days sober in 22 days. Life is immeasurably better without alcohol. Quitting was hard, but worth it. Never going back to that hellscape.

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u/FattyPepperonicci69 Aug 13 '22 Silver Take My Energy

Only at day 50 here

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u/Singlewomanspot Aug 13 '22

Not only but am.

I am proud of you 🎉🎉🎉

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u/Pheaphilus Aug 13 '22

Day 51 starts with day 50! Keep going, you can do this

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u/Sir_Tinklebottom Aug 13 '22

As someone who is only on day 3, I’d kill to swap places. Congrats

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u/FattyPepperonicci69 Aug 13 '22

You got this. The first 25 days were the worst. The rest has just been a test of my anxiety and patience.

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u/Sir_Tinklebottom Aug 13 '22

Yeah hasn’t been fun, after reading the comments here I think I went the wrong way about things.

Cold turkey after regularly drinking 10-15+ drinks a night for 2-3 years. Jesus christ the shakes, sweats, anxiety were so fucking bad.

Day 3 is starting to seem on the upswing. Anxiety is much lower but still present, sweats seem to be only at night, but I still have 0 appetite and can barely keep myself hydrated.

IWNDWYT

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22

Stay the course friend. It sucks but you’ve made it this far. It will get better and it is worth it to stop drinking.

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u/copperboominfinity Aug 13 '22 Wholesome

I’m at day 12. It’s hard.

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22

It is very hard. But it gets easier. Don’t give up.

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u/FattyPepperonicci69 Aug 13 '22

The first 25 are the worst. You got this.

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u/DEADRAIDER420 Aug 13 '22

53 here …

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22

Keep it up!

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u/RainbowAssFucker Aug 13 '22

Nothing 'only' about it . Keep up the good work dude 😎

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u/Leopard2018 Aug 13 '22

Only? Already!! Stay strong!

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22

Keep it up. It’s worth it.

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u/cathabit Aug 13 '22

I'm very proud of you. You're on hard road, but man it's worth it. So worth it. You got this.

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u/bombaderogato Aug 13 '22

Ayy!! Day 1,000 in 21 more days for me. Congratulations, and stay strong!

Seeing this post brought me back to early days…never again.

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u/Singlewomanspot Aug 13 '22

I am proud of you🎉🎉🎉

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u/thrashaholic_poolboy Aug 13 '22

I’m proud of you! Can’t wait to hit 1000.

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u/Bardsal Aug 13 '22

I'm nearing 2000 days, no regrets.

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u/BIGxMAKxATTACK Aug 13 '22

I just got out of the hospital with alcohol induced Rhabdomyolysis, where the protein in your muscles break down and go into your bloodstream and damages your kidneys. Also found out my liver and kidneys were failing me and I have hepatitis. After 2 weeks in the hospital, they were finally able to reverse the effects without dialysis. Now I'm out, but I'm confined to a walker and can barely walk and in severe amount of pain 24/7. I'm only 30...Please people, if you can, stop drinking. Seek help if possible, get a sponsor or go to counseling, anything that helps you. Please don't be like me.

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u/OG_wanKENOBI Aug 13 '22

I'm about to go get blood work done to see just how fucked my liver is and if I have hepatitis or fatty liver. Years of pills and liquor with a year or two of heroin mixed in. Im nervous as fuck. But I guess it's better to know. I've cut way back and now clean from dope for like almost a decade I just hope I didn't completely fuck my body up.

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u/afc1886 Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

My grandfather had a drinking problem from his teens up until his 50s when he went into a coma from cirrhosis of the liver. After a few weeks in the hospital he awoke from the coma and they sent him home. He never drank again and lived a full life until he passed away in his late 80s. It's never too late to turn it around and enjoy your time here on Earth.

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u/OG_wanKENOBI Aug 13 '22

Thank you! Thats what I'm trying to do!

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u/killbills Aug 13 '22

Just curious seeing as you’re only 30, how much did you consume on a daily basis? A handle of vodka a day or something?

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u/AustrianReaper Aug 13 '22

I work with alcoholics from time to time and the worst I've seen was a 28 year old who drank a bottle of vodka with every meal. It's unfathomable how much tolerance they can build up.

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u/PsychedelicFairy Aug 13 '22

For me who is that same age (everyone is different), I drank a pint of vodka per day for about 8 years and then earlier this year it escalated to a fifth (750ml bottle) of vodka PLUS a six pack of beer per day and that lasted about 4 months before I couldn't take it anymore. Luckily the anxiety got to me before any severe physical damage to my organs happened. I had to quit for the panic attacks that I was having every day.

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u/badgerclark Aug 13 '22

I don’t know if they’ll reply, but a close relative of mine is in late stage cirrhosis, has been given a year to live at best, and is only 31. Drinks a 750ml bottle of vodka daily. Refuses to quit, thinks the doctors are wrong, and it’s being blown out of proportion. They’re 31 and have no muscle mass whatsoever, and have basically gray skin at this point, and a massive gut that needs to get fluid removed once a month. Weight fluctuates due to fluid buildup, went from 200-230 in 4 weeks.

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u/Saucemycin Aug 13 '22

I work with a lot of liver disease patients and it’s insane how much fluid is in their bellies. When we tap them (paracentesis, needle in the belly to drain the fluid) we’ll take out usually 2L at a time and it won’t look like we did anything

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u/yvonneuhhcide Aug 13 '22

I had a patient lady week, had a paracentesis to remove how fluid….. 11L. Yes eleven liters removed.

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u/killbills Aug 13 '22

Thats crazy, I couldn’t even imagine drinking half that in a day. Let alone every day. It would be a constant state of inebriation and hung over.

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u/SufficientGreek Aug 13 '22

Actually no, your brain builds up a tolerance even at those quantities. That’s how „functional alcoholics“ can keep working while being drunk. But while the brain can ignore it the body deteriorates.

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u/sunsetmoondance Aug 13 '22

Yep, my ex-husband has been drinking for 45 years. It used to amaze me how much he could drink and not be hungover the next day. He was able to work and function. But he smelled like alcohol. It seemed to come out of his skin. I hated that smell.

He's looking rough now. It has caught up with him. He has gray skin. Sometime even yellow looking. He is diabetic and has diverticulitis.

He's a whiskey drinker. He can go through a couple handles a week plus a case of beer. I've noticed he's drinking more wine now too. Seems to think it's not a bad as the hard liquor.

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u/Playful-Raccoon-250 Aug 13 '22

Big love and support from México. Stay strong.

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u/xxxVIOZxxx Aug 13 '22

Since I was 10 I always said to myself to never drink, the reason for that was seeing my 23yr old neighbour dying from alcohol poisoning.

Hope you're doing fine and may you recover fast.

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u/Sabbathius Aug 13 '22

It was a neighbour for me as well. He was completely plastered and tried riding a bike with some glass bottles. Ended up somehow flipping the bike and landing face-first into the broken bottles. That image was good enough for me.

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u/say_when_finn Aug 13 '22

I'm 43. At age 41 I was diagnosed with stage 2 fibrosis, alcohol induced fatty liver disease, and hepatitis B. I have greatly reduced my alcohol intake but have not yet successfully quit. Even with the prospect of a painful death, and knowing i need to quit, my addiction is still winning.

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22

39 here and diagnosed with cirrhosis w/esophageal varices and fibrosis. Working on 3 years sober and healing well. I hope you can find whatever is that makes it worth it for you to quit drinking completely. You can get better and life is worth living my friend.

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u/KoroSenseiOwO Aug 13 '22

My mom is in hospice because of her drinking. She has about a month to live maybe even less. I haven't talked to her in 6 years and I missed my chance to talk with her, she's basically comatose and doesn't comprehend what you're saying anymore. She had a chance to get a new liver but she had to stop drinking for 6 months. Clearly she couldn't do it. I'm not sad she's dying because she was never in my life but I'm sad she decided to throw hers away for alcohol. I just signed papers for her cremation so she's going soon. Listen to the top comment and get help. It's not a way you want to die.

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u/ccc2801 Aug 13 '22

I’m so sorry

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u/KoroSenseiOwO Aug 13 '22

It's okay. I've made my peace with it, haven't cried yet but I honestly don't know how I should feel about it. She wasn't good to me but it still hurts knowing the only mother I've had decided to throw her life away. The last time I seen her was when I was 15 and she was at my court date in a orange jumpsuit, sucks that that's gonna be the last memory I'll have of her

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u/beard-fingers Aug 13 '22 Silver Eureka!

Hospital social worker here. Plz do not attempt to detox from alcohol or benzodiazepine dependence without first seeking medical attention. Emergency room even, this sort of detox can cause seizures, delirium, and death without appropriate medication.

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u/notMarkKnopfler Aug 13 '22

As someone who detoxed themself, please go to medical detox. It's so much safer and easier.

It was absolutely exhausting and my mother (an NP) was checking on me constantly (and instructed to call an ambulance if I started seizing).

I'd been drinking anywhere from 20-30+ drinks a night, and did a 10 day taper (10 drinks the first day, 9 on the 2nd, 8 on the third, 7 on the 4th, etc etc) until my last beer on the last day. It was absolute torture. I had a bottle of a few valium for if I started to really DT/seize, but mostly just played the ass sweat and sheet karate game while debating on whether it was worth trying to survive all of this.

It's been 5+ years since my last drink and I can definitively say it was worth it... so damn worth it.

But please, if at all possible, detox under medical supervision. Every physician I've talked to since has said that was the dumbest thing I could have possibly done and was a lucky bastard that it didn't go sideways.

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u/DreamMaster8 Aug 13 '22

Is there any reason you couldn't have done like 5 until you feel stable then drop to 4? I dont really know how detox work.

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u/notMarkKnopfler Aug 13 '22

Willpower is very finite at that point. When you’re chemically addicted to something, your brain sorta puts the substance in the same category as food, water, shelter, etc; but also might prioritize it over all of those. If I could stay at 5 for any length of time, that would mean I could stay at 2 or 1 or maybe not even need to quit. (Vicious circle of logic in the addicted brain)

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u/NoMoLerking Aug 13 '22

I had a friend that was an alcoholic. I eventually cut him out of my life but back when I was still trying I’d take him grocery shopping and he was constantly trying to put a 30 rack of Bud Light in the cart. I tried lying and saying I only had about 20 bucks to spare that week and if he got beer he’d barely have any food and he was like “okay, let’s put back the chicken.”

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u/AnOutofBoxExperience Aug 13 '22

As an alcoholic, less food means you can get drunk faster with less. It was quite common to prioritize drinks, then eat a pack of Ramen.

Developed a gluten intolerance because of it. Should have stopped then.

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u/TooCupcake Aug 13 '22

I’ve been wondering about this. Maybe one can’t do it by themselves but if you go into rehab for example, it could be interesting to see if you could decrease tolerance slowly so the patient doesn’t suffer so much. Though I acknowledge that the suffering part must be a big motivation against relapse.

But also, I have a friend who used to be an alcoholic before he had his life together then when he became a father and had to start providing and saw the effect his addiction has on his wife he managed to find the strenght to control himself. He would drink like 3 beers on special occasions then he absolutely refuses to take the next one even if pressured (fuck peer pressure but sadly it happens). It’s because he knows how he wants control over his life and not disappoint his family and it helps him stay in control. So I was also wondering if there could be a lot more spychology involved in treating this instead of just having people be forever afraid of a substance.

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u/Jazeboy69 Aug 13 '22

That’s like saying why don’t heroin addicts just shoot up once a month. Addiction doesn’t work like that. Your primitive brain thinks it’s more important than anything else.

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u/Wetestblanket Aug 13 '22

That’s a pretty fast taper, must have taken a ton of willpower.

In my opinion, you could have probably limited yourself (if you could control yourself enough) to a dozen drinks for 10 days first, then doing what you described except reduce it by one drink every two days instead, quit at five or so drinks a day and then taken the most minimal amount of valium(like 5 mg) after your last day drinking for a week or so which is the most dangerous period, 5< drinks a day would have also put you in this dangerous period, so it’s safer to just use benzos(but not xanax since it’s too short acting) for that period.

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u/Much_Difference Aug 13 '22

Yes, please don't try to get sober only to die in the process. Do it right.

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u/Wetestblanket Aug 13 '22

I know anybody here who has a serious drinking problem or knows someone with one will probably just flame me, so I’m asking you instead, but anyway, what’s the consensus on 2-6 beers a day consistently everyday? Been doing that for like 7-8 years and when I stop I feel fine, maybe bored, sometimes I go a while without drinking because I’m not thinking about it and get distracted by something else, I’ve definitely never had withdrawal symptoms when taking breaks(I’ve had some really nasty withdrawals from a certain obscure alcohol derivative(or something like that, Im not mentioning it specifically here for reasons) after doing it for a few weeks straight and stopping, never felt anything like that from alcohol or benzo prescriptions when stopping, I’m aware what gaba drug w/d feels like).

I know it’s probably not healthy, and very few people don’t have some unhealthy aspect in their life, but I don’t feel like the addiction potential is anything like drinkers who constantly increase intake to the point of downing a handle a day. Steady life long drinking seems to be what the rest of my family does also, usually decreasing consumption in older age, my grandma has a screwdriver for breakfast and doesn’t drink anything else the rest of the day and she’s in her mid 80s and has drank almost her entire life. Actually, if I were to limit myself to only drinking once a day, it’d be a morning beer with breakfast before taking a 30 minute nap before work, which I do every day. I’m aware morning drinking is almost always considered a “red flag”, but I’m not drinking like the guy in the OP.

Am I just an alcoholic making excuses?

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u/Enibas Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

I was maybe in a similar situation to you. I'd drink 4-5 days a week, 2-5 beers, only in the evenings. Never more, never liquor, never got really drunk. But it concerned me because of my health, it cost a lot of money and it made it difficult to maintain my weight. So, I made a deal with myself that I would only drink every other day. And I realized that on the days I wasn't drinking I was kinda waiting for the next day and on the day I was "allowed" to drink, while it wasn't my first thought when waking up, it was maybe my second or third thought, and I'd spent the day waiting for the evening. And that concerned me even more because that are the thought processes of an addict. Maybe a mild addict but an addict nonetheless.

I cut down to twice a week for a few weeks after that, which made it better already (stopped the frequent thinking about it), so I stopped completely for four weeks to show myself that I could, and it was a lot easier than I expected, which was a bit of a relief.

I started to drink alcohol again occasionally after that, first with a strict limit of once a week.

That was 15 years ago, and I probably still drink on average once per week, although it now can happen that I kinda "forget" to drink for a couple of weeks but have a bottle of beer on two evenings the next. I can't say that my life got immediately better or anything (beyond saving a bit of money) but I'm certain that I stopped drinking too much just in time, before I got any problems with my health and before I could develop a stronger addiction or even dependency.

I'm not an expert by any means but if you're concerned about your alcohol intake, even if you aren't strongly addicted, that's already a warning sign in itself in my book. It means you know that you're drinking too much and that it could become a problem. But if you're anything like me, the thought of stopping completely makes you really nervous, too. So reducing your alcohol intake is the next best thing, and worth a try, imo. I've fared extremely well with it, so maybe it is an option for you, too.

Anyway, I wish you the best of luck!

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u/GonzosWhiteShark Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 14 '22

My brother in law, a functional alcoholic, had a pain in his back one day. It got worse and he started feeling sick. He was sick enough that he stopped drinking. A day or so goes by and finally his wife makes him go to the hospital.

Turns out he has MRSA and it’s spread to every organ in his body but his brain.

Now he’s got a major MRSA infection AND he’s detoxing.

He nearly dies several times. Like so much so the family was making plans for his funeral.

Ends up spending 4 months in the hospital and can’t even walk when he gets out. Over the remainder of the year he pulls through.

He’s back to drinking now but “doesn’t get fucked up anymore” smfh

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u/UserOrWhateverFuck_U Aug 13 '22

How do you do that if you cant afford a hospital?

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u/housevil Aug 13 '22 Helpful

r/StopDrinking is a supportive community on Reddit for those wishing to moderate or altogether stop alcohol consumption.

Be well.

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u/Debbie-Hairy Aug 13 '22

IWNDWYT, 4 years sober, r/stopdrinking was my support.

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u/ruralist Aug 13 '22

IWNDWYT

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u/heratonga Aug 13 '22

Just joined ☹️

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u/TheRealCeeBeeGee Aug 13 '22

Well done, you won’t regret it. 4+ years for me, mostly with the help of that sub.

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u/heratonga Aug 13 '22

I’m not that far from that poor fella, scary to see but obviously a lot worse to poke your head in the sand and think it’s not that big a problem. Don’t think I’ve ever replayed a vid so many times...

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u/Chuckles42 Aug 13 '22

You can do it! Find your motivation beyond the alcohol. Find out why you get up in the morning. Even if you think there’s nothing, there is something. Feed your motivation. Find ways to reward yourself. One day at a time!

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u/JayCroghan Aug 13 '22

Turn that frown around, you took a giant first step. I’m a recovering alcoholic that isn’t doing so good with it and just reading every post that pops up in my feed there gives me a boost. We’re all in this together and you’ll find a lot of love and acceptance there. Best of luck to you my friend.

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u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

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u/Double_Belt2331 Aug 13 '22

Watched My Name Was Bette: Life and Death of an Alcoholic a documentary on Prime. It helped me realize all these “illnesses” my friend kept having that I was holding her hand through, were, all alcohol related. Especially sad bc she comes from a family rich in alcoholics. Yes, you’re right on saying alcoholisms hurts so so many ppl that never drink it. (Good ending for my friend, she realized she was an alcoholic, sought help & has been sober for 3+ yrs. But some of the shit she put on me … )

Peace, love & strength.

ETA - glad to know Scott is sober now & helping others. Thank you for sharing that.

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u/awesomepossum40 Aug 13 '22

Best r/ on Reddit.

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u/ondrishko87 Aug 13 '22

I had to get off that forum cos I can’t stop crying. I’m in most of these stories and I hate it

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u/Radiant-Psychology80 Aug 13 '22 Silver Helpful

Come on back we’re here for you. Those stories make you cry at first, but after a little dry time you’ll be laughing at your own gut wrenching stories like the rest of us. You aren’t alone and you’re worth it. Recovery is possible with support.

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u/grapefruit_witchh Aug 13 '22

One of my favorite things about any recovery community is the sheer amount of dark humor that everybody has. We can genuinely laugh about our old drug habits, even really fucked up stuff like shooting heroin. My husband thinks I'm insane for some of the stuff I now joke about.

Of course at the beginning it's not funny at all and everything seems horrible and tragic and bleak. But that changes

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u/New_Krypton Aug 13 '22

My girl is going through recovery. I'll show her the sub. ❤️

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u/widget_fucker Aug 13 '22

Made me stop drinking

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u/billions_of_stars Aug 13 '22

I've been sober for over a year and a half after several attempts at quitting. The beginning is always the hardest when it really has a grip on you both physically, socially, and mentally. It took me about a year of getting some true distance from it to truly feel like it didn't have a grip on me in one way or another.

That subreddit really helped me realize that there are a lot of people out there going through a lot of the same stuff.

Anyhow, I can tell you from personal experience that it's possible, you just have to take it one day at a time and eventually alcohol won't be this constant variable in your life. Thinking of what I was gaining rather than losing really helped me a lot too.

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u/AadamAtomic Aug 13 '22

I’m in most of these stories and I hate it

That simply proves YOU are not alone and just like millions of others.

Just like Millions of others, you can beat addiction.

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u/atthwsm Aug 13 '22

Helped me quit more than any friend family or program ever did

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u/Brack_vs_Godzilla Aug 13 '22

My dad died of alcoholism. As a kid I can only remember a only few occasions when he wasn’t under the influence. I recall once after he came home from a couple weeks of rehab he was a different person. A coherent person who could carry on a conversation like I’d never had with him in the past. Unfortunately, it didn’t last and he was back to drinking again. When he was in his mid 40’s the docs told him alcohol would kill him if he didn’t stop and by age 53 he was gone. I enjoy an occasional beer or two, but the way it took over my dad is always in the back of my mind so I will never allow it to take control. Anymore, if I knock down more than 4-5 beers in a week it’s a rare occasion. I won’t allow this shit to kill me like it did him.

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u/codillius Aug 13 '22

My dad died from alcoholism too. He was never a heavy drinker, not until he lost his job in 2008 and went through a second divorce. He built up to a bottle of vodka a day habit within 2-3 years. By the time he saw a doctor they told him he had about 1-2 years to live at most because his liver cirrhosis had gotten so bad. No chance for a donor. He stopped drinking for a year, but I suspect he gave in and had a few last drinks before he passed. 42 years old. I hardly ever drink and never excessively. I’m horrified of what alcohol can do. I never even thought my dad had a problem because he didn’t change much when he drank, just more open and talkative.

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u/Own-Independence6867 Aug 13 '22

Sorry that you had to go through this as a kid. I hope you had others in your family that loved you and cared for you.

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u/J-Bonez420 Aug 13 '22

I quit after 28 years non stop. Its been 2 years. Never felt better. I was doing a 12er of German brews a day. That turned into bottles of vodka and gin. I woke up and had no soul one day and just stopped. I will never touch 1 more drop, fucking destroyed my gallbladder. It's all better now...you can do it!

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u/xlDirteDeedslx Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22 Silver Gold

I used to drink a bottle of liquor or at least 18 beers a night around 5 days a week from the age of 20 till I was around 30. When I quit drinking the depression was so bad and intolerable I was bedridden for almost two months. All I could do was just curl up in a ball and sleep the miserable feeling away. I still have bad stomach problems from popping pills and drinking so long but it's a reminder to stay sober for me.

It took years to get over my alcohol addiction but now I have zero desire to touch the stuff ever again. Drinking when you get older isn't like it is when you are young anyways, the hangovers get worse and you are feel like shit thru half the next day. That is what makes it easier to give up, just feeling good naturally thru the entire day is so much better of a life.

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u/mydickcuresAIDS Aug 13 '22

I haven’t been without a drink for more than 48 hours in probably ten years. At this point my withdrawals get so bad it is life threatening. I’m 36 and I honestly do fear for what’s gonna happen.

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u/Bubbly-Bat-7869 Aug 13 '22

Go to a medical detox center and straight into a residential rehab center. You can do this, life gets insanely better when your sober

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u/IONTOP Aug 13 '22

I did rehab for 60 days (30 was the plan, but I added an additional 30)

Found out the cause behind my destructive drinking. I needed therapy more than I needed rehab. Luckily my specific rehab was a 100% fit for what I needed.

While I still drink, it no longer interferes with work and RARELY has bad consequences. When it does have bad consequences (hangovers or drunken calls to friends/family, never driving obviously) I try to figure out WHY and WHAT was bothering me, and don't drink until I've come to terms with and fixed(to the best of my ability) what made me get so fucked up that specific night. Whether it be sitting down and writing about it, or seeing my therapist to figure it out.

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u/akins40 Aug 13 '22

I’m right there with you man. Was diagnosed with chronic back pain a while back, and the biggest thing that gives me relief is drinking. I was prescribed a shit ton of pain killers that I’ve been avoiding til I’m about a 8-9 on the pain scale level. I feel at some point we’ll find our escape from this.

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u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

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u/akins40 Aug 13 '22

The scary part is I was diagnosed with this at an age of 25, and am now 27. I didn’t want the painkillers to become a dependency; and my family already has kidney and liver problems. So I’ve been trying to bear with the pain as long as I can before feeling I need to go to the ER. Your response is very much appreciated, and sad to say, it’s nice hearing from someone else dealing with something similar and going out of their way to try and help me find a better path. I appreciate you.

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u/acm8221 Aug 13 '22

What if you're trying to avoid becoming dependent on regularly using opioids?

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u/jeffroddit Aug 13 '22

My last friend to drink themselves to death was 46.

Quit now.

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u/FamousOrphan Aug 13 '22

If you can’t afford to go to detox, go see your doctor (or an ER doctor) tell her/him exactly what you said in your post, and ask for a plan and meds to ease withdrawal symptoms.

I was a daily drinker with some serious withdrawal symptoms and I stupidly quit almost cold turkey with no medical advice. Lucky I didn’t die.

Wishing you well, friend.

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u/RevolutionaryAct59 Aug 13 '22

The worst did happen to my sister.

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u/FermontBrand Aug 13 '22 Take My Energy

44 days sober for the first time in 15 years today!

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u/qaddodi Aug 13 '22

Liver transplant doctor here. Stopping alcohol is extremely difficult and can be dangerous without professional help. It’s one of the few substances which withdrawals can end up in seizures and sometimes death. But once successful abstinence is achieved, I always tell my patients “alcohol is forgiving”. Meaning, the liver disease, even if it’s already end stage (I.e. cirrhosis) can improve and liver function can be preserved.

One of the major reasons why we have a strict policy of 6-month of alcohol abstinence before we consider folks for a transplant is not to “prove a point” but rather we see that a majority of those people won’t even need the transplant after 6 months of abstinence.

Stay healthy and well. Seek counseling and addiction medicine specialists. There are a lot of resources and even medications that stop cravings.

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u/7GatesOfHello Aug 13 '22 Wholesome

590 days sober, 215 clean. Do whatever it takes to live.

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u/AnimusFlux Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Apologies for my ignorance on the topic, but I don't understand the difference between clean and sober.

Does this mean that you haven't had a drink in 590 days but you've used other "drugs" within the last 215 days?

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u/7GatesOfHello Aug 13 '22

I my last drink was 591 days ago. I used cannabis to help me quit drinking and eventually that got out of control. I found out this week that it led to the initial stages of emphysema.

Folks with addiction issues are usually suffering from some other issue(s) and turn to chemicals for relief. I call it "pulling levers." Some levers are worse than others but may offer greater relief to the symptoms of the root issues. In my quest to get control over my actions, and thereby actually live life instead of numbly marching toward the grave, I over-did and subsequently burned out the cannabis lever. I quit 215 days ago. Unfortunately, the next thing that will have to go is sugar. It's my current go-to lever and it's bringing in its own set of consequences.

We do what we can to get from where we are to where we are more safe. Agency and harm-reduction are everything.

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u/Sweaty-Toe-7847 Aug 13 '22

Good going, keep working on it, you sound like you have come a long way, you will get there.

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u/JGAllswell Aug 13 '22

Dude (/dudette?), thank you so much for sharing this chapter of your journey, as I'm a little stuck in a similar one and haven't found anyone who gets where I'm at or what it's like.

I had a huge appetite for lots of substances in my early exploring 20s, and have since gave them all up. Am late/adult diagnosed ADHD, and after a decade on relying on the ritual, I burned out on weed. Destroyed/burned to the ground my career, my possessions, my social connections all in the space of a couple months due too psychosis and my own prior mental health.

As for cigarettes... That's always on that razor's edge of a serious problem. I'm at an age where I can still turn it around. It is absolutely compulsive, makes people uncomfortable to varying degrees, and definitely closes a lot of doors for me romantically as well as socially, being in a new city & all.

I'll freely admit I have the appetite of an addict. From my current perspective, when we get that appetite, being clean doesn't mean the appetite is gone. It's like a blown-out stomach; it wants to be filled by something, so watch your portions and diet all you like, your body will always say it wants & can handle more.

I deal with the niggling hunger every day, but especially in this new town/with such fresh friendships, it's never hits when people offer polite congrats on sobriety... then move on all to quickly.

Only in reading all this and trying to articulate it, I can acknowledge that I've compartmentalized a tremendous amount of shame - about my use, about my past - and I never approach dealing with it, because "Cigarettes aren't a serious addiction". Because I shouldn't need help for such a small little evil, compared to the huge things I know are out there/have dealt with in the past.

But I haven't totally dealt with them. The shame and the burden clings like the stink to my clothes, which I can barely tell is there.

It's time for me to seek support. Come Monday, I'm going to seek out drug counselling.

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u/LivingDisastrous3603 Aug 13 '22

Since 14, there wasn’t a span of a week where I wasn’t high or drunk. I got older, and every weekend turned into every other day turned into every day. I’ll stop when I get this job. I’ll stop when I leave this job. I’ll stop when I’m broke. I’ll stop when I save up enough money. I’ll stop when I move, when I get married, when I have a kid, when my divorce is finalized, when I bankrupt my girlfriend and she has to foreclose on her house… jobs, friends, contacts… I burned bridges and danced on the ashes, middle fingers in the air. We all know the story here. This went on for 27 years. Twenty. Seven. Years.

I never thought I’d be here. 7 years clean. You mentioned “levers”. I think that’s a good way to describe it. Just about anything can be a lever. Drugs, alcohol, shopping, gambling, working out, sex, interneting… anything to try to plug up that hole- or holes- in you. That shit we don’t want to deal with. We try to fill it with these temporary things that always run out. And when they do, that hole- that pain- is still there. So we try to cram more shit in it. But the only way to fill that hole is to get in there, look at it, and do the work to repair it from the inside out, bottom to top. Therapy helped me. NA helped some. AA helped some. Being honest with my loved ones and support group, and myself, helped me because it was impossible to do on my own. There is no shame in asking for help. And there is no shame in accepting help when offered. And I don’t mean to sound all militant about it. But, it’s kinda like a war tho. I was fighting for my life. Still am.

But this is my life. I control it. But you have to want to do it. Not like oh yeah I wanna be clean so I can do this or do that. That statement should be “I want to be clean”. Period. Make a choice and be it. Is it that simple? Yes. Is it fucking hard and terrifying? Yes. But you have to really want it. No more half measures, Walt.

I still fail. I still struggle. I’m still scared. But, I’m clean. And I’ll take my worst day clean over any day high. Every. Fucking. Time. If anyone is reading this, you absolutely can do it. I believe in you, even if you don’t believe in yourself. And I don’t even know you. But I know you can. You control you life. Not some bottle, or pill or powder or shiny new thing or person in your bed… you do.

Geez I went off the deep end there lol. But yeah you can do it. Choose it. Be it.

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u/trapsliketomhardys Aug 13 '22

Means alcohol-free for 590 days and drugs-free for 215 👍

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u/cock_a_doodle_dont Aug 13 '22

In my 12-step groups, there was no distinction between the terms. NA took it a step farther, "clean" wasn't simply abstinence, it was when you are actively working the program in order to overcome your diseased perceptions. Abstinence from drugs with no self-work is referred to as "white knuckling"

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u/Ok_Photo9220 Aug 13 '22

Yep. I think that's what they mean.

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u/Nimmyzed Aug 13 '22

Hey buddy, 580 days here! January 2021 was a nightmare, wasn't it? So glad we're on the other side.

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u/tealgrayone Aug 13 '22

My ex husband is an alcoholic. It's what ended our 34+ year marriage. He'd been drinking heavily since he was a teenager. Many health problems. He's lost several friends to alcohol as well. Doesn't make him think he should quit. As he says, they had a problem he doesn't. He has lost his wife, his grown kids don't want to be around him anymore, his family that's still alive can't handle him. He's in and out of the hospital. Diabetic. Liver issues. Stomach and digestion problems.

It's a horrible disease.

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u/sunsetmoondance Aug 13 '22

I know Exactly how you feel. You can't argue with an alcoholic, they don't think they have a problem.

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u/Nicecoldbud Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

My dad was a violent alcoholic drunk until he went to prison and eventually rehab; he went into recovery, got himself clean and even a degree in phycology and helped others through drug and alcohol counseling until he retired.

The man is 27 years sober but still plagued by his mental demons on a daily basis but he doesn't relent.

He is my hero.

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u/Nimmyzed Aug 13 '22

I'm fuckin proud of your dad, man

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u/Nicecoldbud Aug 13 '22

Thanks, he is the strongest man I know.

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u/Appropriate_Oil4161 Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Do you think I drink too much?

I usually have 2 g&ts and a glass of wine a day.

I will freely admit my measures are probs doubles and my glass is a large wine size.

I am female and 59 yo.

I appreciate any respectful answers. Tia.

Edit; thankyou kind strangers for replies. I guess if we have to ask if it's too much, it probably is

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u/tbro6876 Aug 13 '22

The medical guideline is anything over 14 units per week is too much. So 2 doubles and a double pour of wine is ~6 units. If done everyday you’re drinking 42 which is too much. Personally when i drink i always go overboard and drink 12-16 beers a day for 2-3 days around the weekend so right now my best option is to not drink at all.

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u/CarbyMcBagel Aug 13 '22

Every single day? Do you drink more on weekends too (or if it's a holiday or you had a rough day at work or you are celebrating a great day or insert any other excuse here)? I used to say I only had "a couple" drinks on weeknights but that was probably more like 5-6 drinks (heavy pours on those vodka sodas and let's be real a bottle of wine is 3 glasses right?) and on weekends I would have even more and day drink because it's the weekend! Anyways. I'm an alcoholic.

So, yeah, probably too much, honestly. Women metabolize alcohol differently than men, too. This isn't something to be ashamed of but definitely something to think about and seek help for from a doctor/therapist. I'm not saying you can never drink ever but you might want to change your habits.

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u/BooyaMoonBabyluv Aug 13 '22

God damn I am so glad I stopped drinking. Going 5 months strong so far 🤘

If anyone here is struggling with alcoholism, my heart bleeds for you, and I hope you can get the help you deserve ❤️

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u/One-Firefighter3387 Aug 13 '22

Bless his heart 🥺You can see the struggle and how much he wants to save others. I know he will save lives with these videos. It is not in vain!

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u/dillrepair Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Let me hijack to add where someone can see: ETOH withdrawal can kill you several ways. Go to a proper hospital where you can be detoxed appropriately if you cannot carefully wean on your own

Source: I am an icu nurse that has detoxed hundreds if not thousands of people at this point… and many times it’s bad enough we have to put people on IV sedation for a while… sometimes even intubation is required

get appropriate KNOWLEDGEABLE help or possibly die from status epilepticus or the sequelae of abruptly stopping NOT ALL HOSPITALS OR FACILITIES ARE CREATED EQUALLY You need benzodiazepines. Lots of them if you stopped cold. If the nurse is not giving enough you can still have big problems. You are entitled to safe and somewhat comfortable detoxification

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u/bad_toe_tattooes Aug 13 '22

This is Scott Freda. He has over 1600 days sober. He was diagnosed with cirrhosis at age 47 and is a sober coach. His wife died at 43 from the same disease. These videos are re-enactments. He says he was able to reverse his cirrhosis with a very healthy diet.

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u/Whites11783 Aug 13 '22

A healthy diet does not reverse alcoholic cirrhosis. If you have cirrhosis due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, then healthy diet and weight loss can improve your liver. However, in cirrhosis the actual cells of the liver change and much of it is irreversible.

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u/bad_toe_tattooes Aug 13 '22

Yeah, that’s why I was clear in saying that he says he reversed it, not that he actually did. I, myself, have alcoholic cirrhosis.

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u/SSJSES Aug 13 '22

I like Scott and think he has some great things to say BUT you can not reverse cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is permanent scarring of the liver. Now it is possible for the liver to heal damage that hasn’t become permanent. But as someone with cirrhosis it makes me cringe when I hear people say you can reverse it.

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u/bad_toe_tattooes Aug 13 '22

I understand as I have cirrhosis as well. That’s why I tried to make it clear that it’s he himself that claims this. I follow him for the healthy recipe ideas and I 100% relate to his withdrawal/hiding booze videos. Health vibes to you & all others that have this disease.

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u/TMAC_222 Aug 13 '22

I knew someone who died from alcoholism. He was in his mid 40s. His liver had stopped filtering so they had to remove liters of liquid from his body. He looked pregnant. The ammonia levels were so high he slowly lost his ability to talk. He looked like a man in his 80s on his death bed. He didn't stop drinkng after finding out he had cirrhosis. To continue to drink will further cause damage. The death was not kind, it even caused A-fib and he was vomiting blood. Within 5 days of his admittance he had died. I can only imagine this is what he went through daily, to know his body was declining and he couldn't stop drinking. That's why we need more detox centers. Rehab is great, but going to detox for the hardest part; a place that can medically assist with all of their medical issues while a person is detoxing has a better success rate going directly into rehab after. The detox is hard. I've seen it, the vomiting, shakes etc. The body craves it more then the mind. I spoke to a director who runs one. He told me Dr. Drew once said "Addiction is the only disease I've seen people on their death bed make a full recovery." That has a lot to do with the detox approach. He would benefit, they would address all of his medical needs while focusing on his withdrawal symptoms and this director was smart enough to open his detox in a hospital. So not only is there medical support, there is also mental health support.

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u/1Guanocrazycaucasian Aug 13 '22

Lost my oldest sister to Toxic shock due to alcoholism. I’ve watched first hand on what it does to them and people around them. I pray the best for you sir to get the help you need and the strength to face it. I don’t know you, but ever need to chat or vent, hit me up. We got your back my friend. God Speed and God Bless you.

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u/KaiCrafts Aug 13 '22

He does these reenactments to help people quit.

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u/restlessleg Aug 13 '22

i used to drink the big jug of titos every weekend and another throughout the week.

drank like that from 28 until 38.

am 40 now and the thought of it makes me nauseous. i can remember the feeling of overdoing it and uuuuuugh.

fuck no!

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u/Tubulski Aug 13 '22

That isnt even the worst stage of alcoholism. Wait till you hear of Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome ...

When your brain is so damaged that you cant even decide to go to the toilet anymore...

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u/dreadyradical Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 14 '22

As an ER nurse who has taken care of a lot of alcoholics. For the love of all that is holy, I cannot recommend going cold turkey. That and opioid addiction withdrawal/going cold turkey can kill you [EDIT 2 - correction; mistakenly said opioids, benzos are the class that withdrawal from can be fatal]. Do not do it alone, even if your only resource is the hospital. I won’t lie - the healthcare workers won’t be happy to see you, but hopefully they will reign in their judgement, they’ll make sure you don’t die, might make the experience a touch more comfortable, and can provide other resources.

EDIT 1 to say that I have the utmost respect for those trying to quit and those who are sober. Alcoholism destroys your life in so many ways, destroys your friends and family, and I’ve seen too many bodies of innocents involved in accidents with drunk drivers - who walked away without a scratch from the destruction they caused.

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u/fuzzwell Aug 13 '22

I went to the ER when I had finally lost control of my drinking. Drunk at 7:00AM and thought I might die. They put me under, gave me medicine, took care of me, sent me off to rehab after 5 days of intensive care. SAVED MY LIFE. I wish I knew how to thank them, but I can't, so I'll tell you... THANK YOU for the kind treatment and for saving people, even if they make stupid decisions, at some point it is beyond their control.

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u/dreadyradical Aug 13 '22

Thank you so much for sharing that, and I’m so happy to hear of your positive experience and sounds like you’re doing well! Really, it doesn’t take much if you’re interested - a letter (especially with names if you can recall), desserts, or even going back to share your store goes so far. ER and ICU nurses rarely get to hear back about positive cases or recoveries, especially in cases of severe alcoholism, and hearing those stories can make such a difference. Keep up the amazing work!

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u/Whites11783 Aug 13 '22

Just a correction - while alcohol withdrawal is potentially deadly, opioid withdrawal is not. Withdrawing from opioids is miserable and people feel like they are going to die, but it doesn’t carry the actual risk of death (outside of confounding co-morbidities) that alcohol withdrawal does.

This is why the majority of opioid detox and poison use disorder treatment is done in an outpatient setting.

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u/SassyFras07 Aug 13 '22

Learning how to let things go and be positive about has helped me so much. Still gulping the poison, but wayyy less. But i still feel you. Do not start drinking kids. Please.

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u/JoseyWales76 Aug 13 '22

I had a come to Jesus (I’ve had many in the past) about 3 weeks ago when I realized that the “Covid brain fog” wasn’t from Covid at all. I’ve had the cognition speed of a senior citizen for most of my adult live and never wanted to see the connection to my alcohol consumption. 3 weeks later, I can tell anyone with certainly that if you cut out drinking your memory and cognition will improve dramatically.

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u/ExcitementOrdinary95 Aug 13 '22

Damn heartbreaking

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u/Prestigious-Log-7210 Aug 13 '22

My brother was an alcoholic and had a bender and slept too long. Woke up and walked outside to smoke a cigarette and had a seizure because he slept too long and was in alcohol withdrawal. He suffered a severe brain injury from his head hitting the cement so hard. He spent 4 years in a bed in a nursing home unable to speak, move or communicate. But he recognized you if he saw you, which made it sooo much worse. He finally passed away after 4 years of hell. Fuck alcohol!

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u/SithLard Aug 13 '22

I started drinking at 16 and finally stopped at 41. I was always chasing that first drunk when I was young and invincible. I was never able to replicate it, my life progressively became hell to the point of a suicide attempt. 11 years sober since last March with the help of a 12-step program, a group of other drunks like me, and my sponsor.

Today I have no compulsion to drink or use. I'm living life on life's terms. I'm at peace and things have never been better.

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u/rocksteady_7 Aug 13 '22

I was an abuser of heroin and alcohol back then. Heroin withdrawal was pure hell but relatively shorter than alcohol withdrawal. 2 years sober this coming September. And if i ever slip again to dope, please somebody just kill me clean, I don't think I could go through that hell again.

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u/a_warriorinthegarden Aug 13 '22

This isn't even the worst of alcohol withdrawl. I went through the delerium tremens twice and it was like living in Hell for several days. You see snakes in your periphery, you hear things, you feel spiders running all over you and every single time you try to sleep you wake up screaming from a night terror that is so vivid it's indistinguishable from reality. I had a seizure. I had it bad.

I'm 9 years sober now. Have a wife and kid. Do what I love for a living. Alcoholism can be managed. No one is a lost cause.

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u/Ima_Funt_Case Aug 13 '22

I stopped drinking in 2017 because I was buying a bottle of wine every night to get wasted and loved trying all the new craft beers and microbrews a little too much. One night after finishing a bottle of wine I had the bright idea to try to drive and get more, luckily I didn't make it out of my parking space because I threw up on the door of my car before I could leave and realized maybe I shouldn't be driving. A little too close for comfort, haven't had a drink since.

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u/minnesotaris Aug 13 '22

I started drinking at the start of the craft brew phenomenon, 2011. It crept up. Getting the unique stuff of the time, visiting breweries, etc. So much money and wasted time.

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u/4lan9 Aug 13 '22

I remember gaining so much weight in 2013 due to drinking all the 9-12% imperial stouts and shit.

I find it so odd that we are comfortable handing out deadly poison to people for no medical benefit. Imagine if we had craft opiates, and people went out on a sunday to pop small-batch pills with our families while our children play. Then drive them home high on pills

Even the fact that we call being high on alcohol 'drunk' is telling. We have a different name for just this one drug, that makes it sound a lot less bad. Let's call it what it is. When you drink you are getting high on a liquid drug.

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u/Patient_Progress3993 Aug 13 '22

It ruins your body and leaves behind broken families, children spouses friends

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u/Wasted_Possibilities Aug 13 '22

Took me 35 years to quit. At the end was at a 5th, a pint, and few to several high-alcohol tall boys daily. Lost an awesome job by showing up feeling completely normal, but blowing a .223 when nailed by HR. (got the point of drinking a 1/2 pint before work and at lunch just to feel normal while at work. If I didn't, I was throwing up from withdrawals.)

Quit cold turkey, no drugs, no AA. Approaching 600 days alcohol-free.

It can be done.

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u/saladmunch2 Aug 13 '22

Alcoholics were probably some of the most worse off people youd ever see in rehab. Its sad.

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u/Skoofer Aug 13 '22

I’m so glad I hate the way all alcohol tastes. This is rough to see but kudos to this guy for sharing to hopefully help others

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u/Dewrunner4X4 Aug 13 '22

Same, can't fucking stand the taste or smell.

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u/TrumpSucksALotOfCock Aug 13 '22

My father's an alcoholic. His father was an alcoholic. I'm afraid...

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u/xlmagicpants Aug 13 '22

I'm my darkest of times I had abandoned my family to live in the park to be able to drink with those that drink like me. I still remeber those nights when all I could find was rubbing alcohol I didn't have a choice I needed to feel something anything it didn't matter how i got there. I'm here almost 12 years sober because I for a split second had the courage to accept help.

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u/Longjumping-Dog8436 Aug 13 '22

You're not alone. I have to remember that, too. Very glad I've had a daily reprieve. Relapses were terrible, came when I forgot vigilance. I sincerely hope you get to a good place.

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u/beansntoast21 Aug 13 '22

Alcohol withdrawal is terrifying.

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u/Adam__B Aug 13 '22

You do have to go through it alone though. And it’s hell.

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u/Puzzleheaded_Taro283 Aug 13 '22

26th April 2021. That's the day I started to live again. I will never forget that day.

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u/Beezle_Maestro Aug 13 '22

This hits close to home. My brother died of alcohol induced cirrhosis of the liver two months ago. He had the shakes for years.