r/interestingasfuck Jul 01 '22 Silver 1 Wholesome 1 Wholesome Seal of Approval 1

Known as the "Giggling Granny" for her eerily cheerful demeanor, Nannie Doss was secretly a serial killer who had brutally murdered four husbands, two children, two sisters, her mother, two grandsons, and her mother-in-law between the 1920s and 1950s. /r/ALL

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24.5k Upvotes

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6.3k

u/teamjetfire Jul 01 '22

She was 48 year old when she was arrested. It’s crazy to me how old these young ppl look.

4.4k

u/qgmonkey Jul 01 '22

Married at 16 and 4 kids by 21 will do that

2.9k

u/NotTodayNSA5117 Jul 01 '22

Not to mention the murders

2.3k

u/OptimusSublime Jul 01 '22

Oh right...the murders..

644

u/officialmonogato Jul 01 '22

I’m getting massive Jake Peralta vibes here

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u/AdMedium6737 Jul 01 '22

Title of your sextape.

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u/raven12456 Jul 01 '22

It's an old meme. https://m.imgur.com/me6FkAW

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u/PugnaciousPangolin Jul 01 '22

It's an older meme, sir, but it checks out.

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u/offballDgang Jul 01 '22

Don't call me sir, buddy.

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u/KimJongIlSunglasses Jul 01 '22

I’m getting a massive clue.

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u/Vitruvious28 Jul 01 '22

Those pesky murders

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u/spicytackle Jul 01 '22

I'm going to venture a guess that those did not bother her.

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u/Bikinisbottom Jul 01 '22

You thought your thanksgiving dinners were bad…

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u/MissKhary Jul 01 '22

Murders really age you.

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u/PoliteCanadian2 Jul 01 '22

Especially if you’re the victim.

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u/IswhatsIs Jul 01 '22

Just the opposite actually.

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u/TomatoFettuccini Jul 01 '22

And the smoking and drinking.

People forget how much more prevalent both were back then.

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u/CrackHeadRodeo Jul 01 '22

And the smoking and drinking.

People forget how much more prevalent both were back then.

Add poor nutrition and pollution.

103

u/The_BoneManXX Jul 01 '22

And no laws against toxic metals in everyday household items- like lead, mercury, Arsenic etc... etc... If it worked for a certain purpose they used it- like lead in gasoline and paint.

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u/DesmadreGuy Jul 01 '22

Ignoring science and no regulations — it’s just like 2022 all over again.

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u/JoeyBagaDonutxz Jul 01 '22

You want cigarettes in that sandwich?

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u/Mistdwellerr Jul 01 '22

Those may be a way to vent the stress out

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u/magnament Jul 01 '22

To pieces you say?

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u/two_fish Jul 01 '22

To shreds, you say

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u/SmokeyShadow17 Jul 01 '22

Can confirm, my grandma had 13 kids and as far back as I can remember she looked older than her age.

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u/Teknista Jul 01 '22

Thought you were gonna confirm she felt better after killing one or two.

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u/nahthobutmaybe Jul 01 '22

Not to mention it was the heydays of just pouring pollutants out into the air and the water, everyone was taking semi-dangerous to dangerous drugs, drinking, and smoking, no one cared about sun damage, the food was not particularly healthy ... It wasn't a great time to be alive, really.

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u/kwyjibohunter Jul 01 '22

Also everything was made with lead

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u/crazzzone Jul 01 '22

Oh we are return to the past my friend

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u/MadManMorbo Jul 01 '22

As will the common trend back then to be a pack or two a day smoker.

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u/Thund3rh3ll Jul 01 '22

The kids were just temporary tho.

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u/JTCin513 Jul 01 '22

That lady behind her is her 15 yr old sister

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u/Farty-B Jul 01 '22

Looks like one heck of a prom night

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u/lasthorizon25 Jul 01 '22

No one in this photo is over 25

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u/WirelesslyWired Jul 01 '22

The guy second from the left. His suit is over 25.

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u/gitsgrl Jul 01 '22

People don’t change their style much as the age through adulthood so we’re used to seeing old people with this style, but they had it for 60 years. My grandkids will think Vans, tattoos and cutoff jeans are for geezers.

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u/discoqueenx Jul 01 '22

I'll keep my side part and skinny jeans for eternity!!!! low rise jeans can burn in Hades

36

u/mean_bean_machine Jul 01 '22

My Jncos are not gonna pair well with a walker.

12

u/ICanBeKinder Jul 01 '22

Not true at all, JNCOs are large enough to easily fit on your walker.

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u/JagerBaBomb Jul 01 '22

They're coming back, apparently.

At least, Jnco has decided now is the time to be cashing in on nostalgia.

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u/ShelSilverstain Jul 01 '22

I hate to tell you this... But my kids totally think that Vans, Converse, skinny jeans, band shirts, and tattoos are for old people. They like mom jeans and Newbalance shoes, old Harley dealership shirts, and vintage Camel Cigarette caps

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u/DorkusMalorkuss Jul 01 '22

I'm a high school counselor and most of the kids at school wear Vans and Converse. They're still tremendously popular.

42

u/baalroo Jul 01 '22

My daughters all wear vans, converse, skinny jeans, band shirts, and want tattoos. Most of the kids at their schools dress similarly it seems.

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u/Neuchacho Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

Yeah, there are elements of those 80s/90s/00s styles that are just as popular today as they were then. Especially when it comes to designs that don't anchor themselves to some fad design element that was present. Typical Converse/Vans designs would fit in at any point from the 80s to now and not raise an eyebrow as being out of place. Jeans generally do too unless they dip into emo-skinny for men or ultra-wide varieties. The only thing that gives away a band shirt's time is the band itself, and even then, a lot of bands in those time periods are still actively making music and are relevant today.

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u/indyK1ng Jul 01 '22

It's not thee style that makes them look old. She looks legitimately rough for 48 by today's standards.

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u/CheshireC4t Jul 01 '22

I think it's probably a little of both. Also remember smoking and boozing and such weren't as much of a concern in those days

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u/KaiserReisser Jul 01 '22

Tbf her dress, glasses, and hairstyle are things we have come to associate with old people. Being overweight isn't helping either.

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u/smkaemp Jul 01 '22

Back when no one exercised and your doctor recommended a diet of butter and cigarettes

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u/Phirez Jul 01 '22

"Smoke these Land O'Lakes and call me in the morning."

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22

[deleted]

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u/TripperDay Jul 01 '22

48 isn't young, it isn't ancient either.

I'm 49 and...yeah.

71

u/idrow1 Jul 01 '22

I'm 50 and...I feel 80.

101

u/nemocluecrj Jul 01 '22

Shit, I'm 40 and feel haggard af. All my older friends kept warning me for years that it's all downhill, physically speaking, after your mid 30s, yet I ran around still acting like I was invincible, drinking heavily and inflicting a lot of other unnecessary self harm. I woke up one morning around the time I was 37 with a hangover and a backache, and they've never gone away.

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u/societymike Jul 01 '22

Exactly same for me, but I'm 45, no, 46 now and heads up, it keeps getting worse!

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u/nemocluecrj Jul 01 '22

Yeah, I try to tell my younger friends just like all the others told me. That stamina and energy you enjoy is short lived, so you better get the most out of it while you can. I'm going back to school this fall, too, and it's gonna suuuuuuuuck. I know that it can be done, but I'm definitely having to plan around the fact that I can't go ninety to nothing all damn day like I used to.

40

u/willowhawk Jul 01 '22

Nigga I’m 26 and have no energy. By the time I’m 40 I’ll be a plant.

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u/ksp3ll Jul 01 '22

Yeah, a power plant. Go get em tiger.

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u/trundlebed5 Jul 01 '22

Yeah, I feel that. Nothing but exhaustion and pushing myself everyday of my life thinking that being out of breath was normal. Turns out I have sleep apnea and Inattentive ADHD.

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u/trackdaybruh Jul 01 '22

The one thing that helps halts off body aging like that is to be physically active through daily exercise.

If you live a sedentary lifestyle, your body will have a lower baseline of what is and what isn't a workout exertion (Ex: If you workout everyday, getting out of bed will be child's play for your body. But if you're sedentary, getting out of bed will be treated with your body exerting harder than usual, which can cause a muscle pull or etc.)

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u/Kennfusion Jul 01 '22

Sorry to hear. I am 50...and I feel 30.

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u/Marlbey Jul 01 '22

I’m 49… she easily looks 15 years older than me.

I dont think it’s the skin. It’s the hair and the clothing that make her look old/ frumpy.

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u/SrGrimey Jul 01 '22

I would add Sun, people forget how Sun is an asshole to the skin.

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u/UnicornKitt3n Jul 01 '22

I think it’s also the difference in how we treat beauty standards compared to now versus then. Back then, it was visibly looking adult women in ads in fashion and beauty. Now, half of them look like overgrown children.

It’s all about, look as young as possible for as long as possible. Back then, it was okay to look like an adult.

Our definitions and ideas of aging have been incredibly warped.

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u/BiPolerMonkey Jul 01 '22

no way she 48 in this no way

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u/teamjetfire Jul 01 '22

She actually might be younger given that she wasn’t arrested here

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u/mosquitospy Jul 01 '22

They are "District court 4" so maybe they were in trail.

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u/Sixwingswide Jul 01 '22

"The District Court 4 Trail is for experienced hikers only, typically for your mass-murders, serial killers, and people driving under the speed limit."

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22

People in western countries and have only started looking younger due to advances in lifestyle and medicine. The average 30 year old man for example in the 60's, 70's, 80's back only a few decades ago who worked harsh manual labour and who smoked and drank constantly looked 45. I remember all my uncles and father looking older than their age due to that. It's still the case in third world countries.

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u/FireTheLaserBeam Jul 01 '22

My parents divorced when I was a baby and my mother remarried a 45 year old man when I was only 5. She was around 25 years old. They also divorced and he died shortly after I graduated high school, but I remember him looking like a piece of wrinkled leather. He was the manager of a deep sea marina and he smoked 2 packs a day and constantly drank Pabst Blue Ribbon (before it became hip). I’ll be 43 in a few days and I honestly don’t think I look as old as he did.

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u/quintus_horatius Jul 01 '22

He was the manager of a deep sea marina

Say no more. Working on or by the sea will age your skin super fast. UV exposure.

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u/FireTheLaserBeam Jul 01 '22

Died of melanoma.

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u/_ChestHair_ Jul 01 '22

Just a quick PSA to always wear and re-apply sunscreen, people. Shit'll turn you into walking leather and kill you if you give it the chance

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u/Plaster_Lion Jul 01 '22

Look up Joe Biden at the Anita Hill testimony. He was 48 then and he looked 60 plus.

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u/radialomens Jul 01 '22

And while there, watch the Anita Hill testimony if you haven't seen it already

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u/tvb46 Jul 01 '22

Here clothing and hair style is old looking to our standards, but here face ain’t that old looking right?

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u/Lotus_Dokai Jul 01 '22

From here wikipedia:

At age 7, while the family was taking a train to visit relatives in southern Alabama, Nannie hit her head on a metal bar on the seat in front of her when the train suddenly stopped. For years after, she suffered severe headaches, blackouts and depression. Doss blamed these and her mental instability on that accident.

This is interesting, I have heard of head trauma being linked to all types of psychological issues, I wonder if this contributed.

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u/Anokest Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

The article mentions that she was declared sane by multiple psychologists which I find hard to believe if you read the way she behaved around the officers who were investigating her. Maybe also has to do with the definition of "sane" in that day versus now?

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u/YvesSaintWarrant Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

That’s exactly what I had noticed when I was reading the article. Like, the reason this is still a known thing is based solely on her being referred to as the “Giggling Granny” and other pseudonyms because of how insane she had been acting. I can’t fathom someone could clear this woman as sane. At least based on the picture this article paints.

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u/booze_clues Jul 01 '22

Sane doesn’t mean mentally healthy or normal, just that you can recognize right and wrong. If you’re suffering from depression and bipolar disorder, but you can fully recognize that murder is wrong you’re still sane even though you’re mentally ill. She may act weird and suffer from mental illness but if she can understand right and wrong and control her actions she’s legally sane.

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u/ataraxic89 Jul 01 '22

Legally speaking sanity is merely the ability to recognize right from wrong.

Almost all serial killers are "sane".

They know murder is wrong.

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u/thecrawlingrot Jul 01 '22

“Sane” might have just meant she wasn’t mentally ill in a way that diminished her responsibilities for her actions. AFAIK to be considered “criminally insane” and able to use it as a defense, you have to either be so disconnected from reality that you don’t understand that you did anything wrong or committed your crimes during a mental break where you weren’t fully aware of/ in control of your actions. Still seems a bit strange since her behavior, especially how quick she was to confess to get a magazine back, makes it seem she doesn’t have a good grasp on how serious her situation is.

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u/hyunji_ Jul 01 '22

Lack of an understanding of the severity of punishment for crimes would fall under “Incompetent to Stand Trial,” which is what many people are dubbed as they undergo psychiatric evaluation prior to trial. Her behavior is unusual and takes light the punishments, but brain damage, emotional instability, and an incomplete understanding of punishment for one’s crimes are not reasons to deem someone NGRI (not guilty by reason of insanity) or permanently IST (incompetent to stand trial). Lots of criminals don’t understand the severity of their crimes or punishments but they are still charged with them. NGRI / IST patients are a whole different case and generally will never see freedom outside of a psychiatric hospital anyways.

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u/GaimanitePkat Jul 01 '22

if I recall the LPOTL podcast correctly, she was also sexually abused by family members and then blamed for it.

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u/Dakooder Jul 01 '22

Yup! Marcus also talked about her being hyper sexual because of the attention it gave her.

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u/DopeAsHecc Jul 01 '22

Yeah, the frontal lobe damaged at a young age when it’s more vulnerable. Very common among serial killers

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u/CryptoTruancy Jul 01 '22

Good thing all my concussions were from the side and back of my head! Ha Haha Ha... Ha

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u/SunnyDay20212 Jul 01 '22

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u/wacka20 Jul 01 '22

How come older articles are always so well written.

This was a refreshing read compared to articles of the last 5 years

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u/Spork_Warrior Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

As someone who has been in the industry for a long time...

The quality issue is because it has become increasingly difficult to make money from news stories. Everyone thinks they are a content provider now. Meanwhile, news aggregators try to syphon off money from clicks, leaving the actual writer of the news story with pennies for their efforts.

The end result is news writers who try to make up their revenue shortfall by cranking out many news stories - as fast as possible. That means a lower quality news product.

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u/victory_zero Jul 01 '22 Silver Wholesome

Here, lemme help you with that...

As someone who has been in the industry for a long time...

Click here to find out what you already know, on 20 pages that you have to click thru one by one, that is once you beat a dozen full-page ads with no X and sound blasting to rival Glastobury.

The quality issue is because it has become increasingly difficult to make money from news stories. Everyone thinks they are a content provider now. Meanwhile, news aggregators try to syphon off money from clicks, leaving the actually writer of the news story with pennies for their efforts.

The end result is news writers who try to make up their revenue shortfall by cranking out many news stories - as fast as possible. That means a lower quality news product.

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u/ProfessionalMockery Jul 01 '22

"Top 10 reasons why articles are worse than they used to be! YOU WON'T BELIEVE NUMBER 9!"

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u/MordinSolusSTG Jul 01 '22

Number 8 will fuck your wife and your sister!

sick guitar riff

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u/LuxNocte Jul 01 '22

This is even funnier (and accurater) because you stole Spork Warrior's content.

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u/Spork_Warrior Jul 01 '22

And will I get a commission? Noooo

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u/Ramscales Jul 01 '22

Also, the elimination of copy editors.

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u/Relleomylime Jul 01 '22

Also, as several friends that work in journalism have told me, a lot of cheap stuff can be written by bots now and quickly edited by remote copy staff.

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u/Oz_of_Three Jul 01 '22

the actually writer

brought to you by Auto-Incorrect

Additional funding provided by the word "smart", now an electronic oxymoron doing it's buisiness in the palm of your hand!

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u/notLOL Jul 01 '22

How come older articles are always so well written.

because it used to pay well. Now you have to compete with bots that cludge together articles after you link it to multiple source texts. You'd be surprised how many of these articles exist behind a pay or subscription wall.

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u/Shawnanaginsss Jul 01 '22

The "article" linked also is not a news article, but a historical review. At the time of writing, the complete "story" of this woman was available and catalogued through primary sources, some of which are referenced in the writing.

Contemporary news writing doesn't have the luxury of being a secondary source which can wait for all of the information to be clear and available. Ready access to news options also means that it's a race to be the one to provide unique details before competitors which means a lot of modern news tends to be short, vague, or underdeveloped at first publishing.

Lastly, prior to television (and more so before radio) print news articles were often more "entertaining" to read, and would be written more as short stories, rich with descriptive details. There's a partial conflict in modern news media in that descriptive details can often be subjective, and modern journalistic ethical standards emphasize neutral, objective language (even if this isn't always followed, it's something many news readers desire today).

If you want a similar comparison that goes into detail, "The Borden Murders" by Sara Miller includes segments from newspapers published during Lizzy Borden's investigation and trial, and contrasts the biased descriptive language that the different papers use.

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u/DBCOOPER888 Jul 01 '22

This was only 2007.

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u/Anilxe Jul 01 '22

Killing her newborn grandson with a stick pin just hours after he was born, fucking brutal

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u/DreamMaster8 Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

But what's crazy is her daughter though she killed her kid but zhe still gave her the next one, who also died... and didn't contact the police.

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u/Sabiis Jul 01 '22

"In the drug-induced haze of post-partum recovery, Melvina thought she saw her mother stab the baby with a stickpin. She told family members, but no one confronted Nannie. Some six months later, Melvina left her toddler, Robert, in her mother's care. The boy mysteriously died from asphyxia"

How the fuck do you think you see your mom stab your child, and then 6 months later leave your other child with her?!

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u/black_dragonfly13 Jul 01 '22

It is unbelievable to me that her first husband and her eldest daughter left any of their children in Nancy's care. Also, what was her obsession with murder by prunes?

I cannot wrap my head around either of those facts.

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u/Lance_Henry1 Jul 01 '22

"This tea tastes like almonds."

"It must be the almond cookies."

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u/MightyFrex Jul 01 '22

That movie scarred ten year old me and these lines stuck. I remember them often. I’ve never experienced anyone outside of my family refer to it, either. Thanks for the reference. It’s (oddly) made my day.

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u/DokterManhattan Jul 01 '22

What movie?

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u/MightyFrex Jul 01 '22

[The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane](TheLittleGirlWhoLivesDowntheLanehttps://g.co/kgs/3mHohn)

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u/quiet_neighbor_kid Jul 01 '22

I just read the plot of this movie and I’m sorry wtf it was rated PG??????

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u/Zero_VonSpooky Jul 01 '22

Welcome to the Wild West of 70’s era movies. Lasted all the way to 1984 when pg13 became a thing. Actually 38 years ago to the day.

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u/DotRD12 Jul 01 '22

Literally 1984

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u/EarPrestigious7339 Jul 01 '22

I Googled it. The Little Girl who Lives down the Lane

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u/LordBrandon Jul 01 '22

Cyanide tastes like bitter almonds. I thought that meant it tasted like almonds that were a bit bitter, but apparently there is a different nut called "bitter almond"

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u/katwowzaz Jul 01 '22

Is that a Roald Dahl reference?

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u/MangoMCD Jul 01 '22

That's what I remember it from, from the story the "Landlady" where she poisons her victims and taxidermies them.

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u/Harsimaja Jul 01 '22

Not actually the Roald Dahl short story but there’s a similar exchange where he notices the tea tastes like almonds… but that’s a common motif because cyanide is known to taste that way. As a Brit Roald Dahl wouldn’t have mentioned ‘cookies’. It’s from the Canadian film ‘The Little Girl who Lives Down the Lane’

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u/katwowzaz Jul 01 '22

Ooh, good catch, you’re right. It would have been biscuits lol

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u/zoomba2378 Jul 01 '22

Looked up her Wikipedia profile and yea she had a reasonably fucked beginning to her life. Has there ever been a serial killer with a happy childhood?

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

It's actually surprisingly common to the point where psychologists agree that childhood abuse and neglect likely don't contribute to psychopathy itself. Childhood trauma does lead to anxiety disorders and PTSD but psychopathy seems to be more related to actual physiological issues such as a dysfunction of neurotransmitters in the brain. In short, you can be the best parent in the world and your kid can still turn into a serial killer. Ted Bundy and Jeff Dahmer both had normal, healthy childhoods with supportive parents. Source

Edit: supportive family members, not necessarily parents. I'm just quoting the article so maybe they meant normal compared to kids who get beaten everyday. I think the main argument from the scientific community is that A LOT of kids are neglected, yet only a handful become serial killers. I'm sure that neglect doesn't help but it seems like there has to be something else going on in their brain to even have those tendencies in the first place, especially at such a young age.

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u/mellowcrake Jul 01 '22

I don't know anything about Jeff Dahmer but Ted Bundy didn't have a normal healthy childhood, even though he himself insisted he did. He was born in a home for unwed mothers which was a very shameful thing back then. He spent the first 3 months of his life alone at the home while his family debated whether to give him up for adoption. His mother wanted to give him up but her father made her keep him and many Bundy experts speculate that he was actually conceived when this man, his grandfather, raped his own daughter. His grandfather was prone to violent rages and people in the community called him an extremely violent and frightening individual when they testified at court hearings. Ted grew up being told that his mother was actually his sister, even though he never actually believed it.

A talented landscape gardener, Cowell [Ted's grandfather] was obsessed with the delicate alpine plants that he nurtured. He would kick dogs until they howled and swing cats by the tail if the animals got near them. According to Louise's [Ted's mother] youngest sister, Julia, he would "get so mad that he would jump up and down" and rage at the men who worked for him.

Ted's mother Louise had a similar temperament and was praised for it by her father. She was described as cold and hard to get close to.

Eleanor, Ted's gentle grandmother, was repeatedly taken to hospitals for shock treatments for depression. Her fears grew until she refused to leave the house, a victim of agoraphobia.

There's a lot of creepy and messed up stuff about his family and childhood if you look into it.

Personally I suspect that many more mass murderers and truly fucked up people than we think had a very messed up upbringing, but abusive families are so good at presenting themselves as a perfect family.

I do think there are parts of the brain that make certain people more inclined to psychopathy than others, but I also think it probably requires a trigger in the form of witnessing or experiencing abuse in some form, at least more than we realize.

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u/PositivelyCharged42 Jul 01 '22

Pretty sure Jeffrey Dahmer lived with his single mother (also shameful back in the day), and she would make him wait outside while she fucked guys she worked with. She was definitely abusive, and iirc he killed girls who reminded him of his mother. Of course he eventually killed her as well, but it seemed like he was taking out his life long negative emotions through these heinous acts.

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u/gold_plated_lemon Jul 01 '22

The takeaway I’m getting from this is that with a loving home, you can raise a very “successful” serial killer.

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u/CrimeForumThrowaway Jul 01 '22

Dahmer's family was pretty fucked up, if you ever read about them. His dad also told him he'd be disowned (or "re-educated") if they thought he was gay, which he was. Probably didn't do much good there.

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u/Constant-Ad9201 Jul 01 '22

"so how did your last three husbands die again? huh that's crazy, what are the odds. oh well, lightning never strikes four times right?'

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u/StrawberryinPizza Jul 01 '22

Given the time, I would say she probably told the new husbands she was a widow and that was it. There was no way of checking it back then.

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u/mypancreashatesme Jul 01 '22

She met her victims through lonely hearts letters. They were all from different areas and once she’d kill one she’d have some already warmed up with letters to move onto next. She was quite cunning but a total monster.

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u/nothumbs78 Jul 01 '22

Husbands should be like Kleenex: soft, strong, and disposable.

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u/rascally1980 Jul 01 '22

That’s crazy! When is the Netflix documentary coming out?

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u/finc Jul 01 '22

Netflix needs to make it into a six part series with the same three photos displayed over and over again accompanied by very slow, suspenseful narration

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u/AgDA22 Jul 01 '22

My wife will love that.

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u/HoneyRush Jul 01 '22

I hate those. Complete BS. I prefer stories like that in podcast form because they can't waste my time with pictures and suspenseful music

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u/woodiegutheryghost Jul 01 '22

Last Podcast just covered her.

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u/longtimelurker8246 Jul 01 '22

love LPOTL but haven’t been keeping up lately since there’s been a lot of paranormal and relaxed fit episodes - so glad to hear they covered this case! Going to listen now, thanks!

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u/awkward_albatross Jul 01 '22

I'm happy to know I'm not the only one that skips those episodes lmao

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u/scullys_alien_baby Jul 01 '22

their fanbase must be so chaotic to manage because those are far and away my favorite episodes

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u/SolicitatingZebra Jul 01 '22

Same. Give me more paranormal/cryptic shit. Henry and Ben really shine on those ones.

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u/chadork Jul 01 '22

The Leopold and Loeb series was funny.

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u/lordZ3d Jul 01 '22

How in the 9 hells does someone murder their entire family and only get arrested after their 11 murder after 30years? I mean how shit were the cops in her town?

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u/Bathroomsteve Jul 01 '22

I think she was in multiple places, but also it is the early 1900s, where people would die to alot more stuff that we currently have meds for. She was also this smiling old lady, which back then especially people would probably have the notion in their head that someone like her could never be a killer. I'm sure it just seemed like she was one of those people whose life was plagued with tragedy. It was a doctor asking for an autopsy that got her caught, not even the cops being suspicious.

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u/ipdipdu Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

That’s a bit like Harold Shipman, one of the most prolific serial killers. A colleague of Shipman’s and a local taxi driver who was driving the patients to appointments who both became suspicious of all these elderly people, usually women, who died under his care. Went to the police who dropped the case. He only got arrested later cause he forged one victim’s will.

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u/Womec Jul 01 '22

Don't do more than 1 illegal thing at a time.

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u/ScarletDarkstar Jul 01 '22

It actually happened over years and in 3 or 4 different states, so it wasn't like the same people kept seeing people around her die and thinking nothing of it.

I doubt she would have gotten away with it for so long now, but databases weren't so accessible in the 40s, and she went through 5 different names as well, with all her marriages.

It started with 2 of her 4 daughters, who they knew were poisoned, but probably believed it was accidentally.

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u/Suspicious-gibbon Jul 01 '22

I mean, there comes a point, probably after three or four close relatives meet an untimely demise, that you’d have to think that being around this person is bad luck.

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u/LuvliLeah13 Jul 01 '22

They just didn’t believe women were capable of that. It was often thought our sensibilities to delicate to do such a thing.

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u/sincerelyanonymus Jul 01 '22

That’s one of the reasons why women have been the some of the most successful serial killers. That plus their tendency to be subtle about it.

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u/EphDuEmeStRal Jul 01 '22

Glad to see such a girlboss prove them wrong. 😌

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u/JackC747 Jul 01 '22

Do you think the Giggling Granny successfully utilised girl power when she murdered 11 people?

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u/Hello_There69420 Jul 01 '22

One of my favorite lines from him. The delivery and timing is just so fucking good

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u/Butterbuddha Jul 01 '22

It’s a small town. Everybody probably knew giggling granny their entire lives. Not just knew of her, they probably tried her jelly in the annual contest. Of course she wouldn’t hurt a fly. She’s a pillar of the community!

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u/Research_is_King Jul 01 '22

People died from mysterious infections a lot in those days. It’s not like they were doing tox screens on everybody that died. And two of her victims were under 2 years old, that probably was not unusual

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u/GarzysBBQWings Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

Well in most small towns, the cops suck ass.

Edit: Oh wow this blew up! I’d buy you all a dozen roses, but fuck 12.

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u/Throwaway47321 Jul 01 '22

Yeah cops in the ‘50s too.

Like there is no forensics, very little hard science, zero communication between agencies, and no witnesses.

You could have been a serial killer and just moved 20 miles and you’d probably never get caught.

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u/gacdeuce Jul 01 '22

“Sir we found some of the killer’s blood in the other room”

“GROSS! Clean it up! Now back to my hunch…”

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u/Numerous_Witness_345 Jul 01 '22

"...someone said they saw a black man three days ago."

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u/Hazard666 Jul 01 '22

...her family never caught on?

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u/watchescarsandav Jul 01 '22

I guess they figured it out when it was their turn to be murdered.

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u/finc Jul 01 '22

Wait a minute! You! It’s you! I’m going to tell everergh

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u/thedude37 Jul 01 '22

He just stopped carving!

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u/BoJackB26354 Jul 01 '22

Are you implying she killed her family in Castle Aaargh?

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u/YankeeSR23 Jul 01 '22

What family? She killed them all it sounds like.

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u/Select-Background-69 Jul 01 '22

There was an Indian version of this a few years back. She wanted all the properties and belongings to herself. So she first killed husbands dad by adding poison to his food. Then she gave her husband placebo for his medicines so he died. I think the child was killed in a lake or well don't recall.

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u/Tsquash Jul 01 '22

Oh it can’t be her ..she’s a giggler!

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u/AdditionalTheory Jul 01 '22

Okay, but what was the fourth husband thinking?

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u/slice_my_life Jul 01 '22

"I can fix her"

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u/patchyj Jul 01 '22

Sure she night have killed her last 3 husbands, but that's probably because they didnt love her enough

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u/Butterbuddha Jul 01 '22

It was a long time ago and she moved all around.

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u/AmericanoWsugar Jul 01 '22 Evil Cackle

Like the t-shirt says: ‘Can’t have manslaughter without the laughter.’

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u/Zealousideal-Fig-319 Jul 01 '22

I think her first was one of her grandkids she just took a pin she had on her and used it to poke his soft-spot. The day he was born

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u/bsrg Jul 01 '22

Not the first, but that one was the hardest to imagine someone doing.

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u/GWindborn Jul 01 '22

That's the one that always gets me when her story comes up. I just can't imagine what drives you to kill something so soft and defenseless.

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u/[deleted] Jul 01 '22

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u/HorrorMakesUsHappy Jul 01 '22

“She pleaded guilty on May 17, 1955, and was sentenced to life imprisonment; the state did not pursue the death penalty due to her sex.”

She must've been really fucking good.

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u/Pr0glodyte Jul 01 '22

To die for.

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u/cycycle Jul 01 '22

I now understand why the fourth husband married her.

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u/vik8629 Jul 01 '22

Crazy in head, crazy in bed.

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u/jiujitsy Jul 01 '22

Everyone in that picture looks guilty

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u/natali9233 Jul 01 '22

Especially the man and woman directly behind her. I’m curious who they actually are, especially the woman holding her hand.

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u/PlumPumper Jul 01 '22

Except for the guy on the right. His outfit is fabulous.

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u/TheBusThatWasSpeed Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

HI IM NANNIE! All the way through the LPOTL series on her I was waiting for that

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u/ZeLebowski Jul 01 '22

I was just listening about her on Last Podcast on the Left

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u/CrJ418 Jul 01 '22

Looks eerily like Ginny Thomas.

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u/SailorMBliss Jul 01 '22

and now my morning is complete, thank you!

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u/Grogosh Jul 01 '22

That's Delores Umbridge!

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u/Chirimokaari Jul 01 '22

"the state did not pursue the death penalty due to her sex"

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u/TheRecapitator Jul 01 '22

She looks like a pro wrestler trying to mimic Mrs. Doubtfire.

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u/Rick_Lekabron Jul 01 '22

ok ok, we got it. She didn't like her family.

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u/JaffacakePimpstick Jul 01 '22

Theres a good frank turner song about this called perfect wife, if anyone is interested

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u/BendItLikeBlender Jul 01 '22 edited Jul 01 '22

Every time Last Podcast on the Left covers someone new there is always a post made about them on Reddit soon after. They just covered Nannie Doss last month.

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