r/MapPorn Aug 12 '22 Silver 5 Helpful 3 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Gold 1 Facepalm 1

Share of people who do not want people of another race as neighbours

Post image
18.2k Upvotes

2.3k

u/argvil19 Aug 12 '22

Venezuela is kind of a surprise to me. We are a very diverse country but also very close-minded. I wonder what was the definition of "people of another race" for the people that was interviewed.

888

u/luisrof Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 13 '22 Helpful

For starters the data is 22 years old for Venezuela and it's known that the study made some mistakes with other countries (until they were pointed out in a reddit thread interestingly enough).

I checked the questionnaire and there's an element missing (77) but it appears in the results. I don't know, it's fishy.

https://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/WVSDocumentationWV4.jsp?COUNTRY=508&COUNTRY=508

According to 2021 data Venezuela is at 7.9%.

45

u/Lower-Werewolf2720 Aug 13 '22

I remember when this article was first published in WaPo in 2013. There was so much backlash from experts that Max Fisher (the journalist who wrote the first article) actually wrote a follow-up article explaining why these maps are not very good at explaining racism.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/17/5-insights-on-the-racial-tolerance-and-ethnicity-maps-from-an-ethnic-conflict-professor/

→ More replies

293

u/ZA44 Aug 12 '22

I’m wondering that too, does race = culture?

118

u/ZackHLP Aug 12 '22

God i hope not. What a stupid thing to link together

170

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

[deleted]

51

u/Bolddon Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

In most languages race is the same word as breed. Like breeds of dog.

20

u/Artistic_Iron_3177 Aug 13 '22

In Italy we say "ethnicity", if you use "race" you sound like a fascist

→ More replies

75

u/terfsfugoff Aug 13 '22

Human "races" don't have nearly the same genetic diversity as dog breeds though.

20

u/Chester-Donnelly Aug 13 '22

It would be a strange world if they did. Imagine a Great Dane person next to a Yorkshire Terrier person.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

135

u/Miss-Figgy Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Same with India. India is extremely multi-ethnic, I wonder if "race" to them was interpreted as like a foreigner, not another fellow Indian hailing from a different culture/religion.

→ More replies

171

u/godless-life Aug 12 '22

Same for China. They have 50-something different ethnicities which are more or less alright, but actual foreigners? Most wouldn't want that.

240

u/gamaknightgaming Aug 12 '22

Well the country is still like 90% Han Chinese even if there are more than 50 ethnicities

57

u/Naos210 Aug 13 '22

The problem with that is the definition of "Han", which involved a lot more integration than other recognized ethnic groups. Also the fact Han in and of itself has quite a few regional differences.

25

u/terfsfugoff Aug 13 '22

Yeah, Han actually covers a lot of different linguistic groups for starters. "Han" is about as congruous as "Indo-European".

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/TestCode555 Aug 13 '22

yea i'm pretty sure it skews the results in eastern europe as well. A lot of asian people in russia, not a lot of african or south american descent.

7

u/SilentSamamander Aug 13 '22

China very much has a good foreigner/bad foreigner lens and it's almost entirely tied to skin tone unfortunately. I lived there for 3 years in very different parts of the country and as a white man I was welcomed with open arms and seen as almost a status symbol friend.

My black friend endured the most ignorant treatment I've ever seen.

→ More replies

5

u/Maxathron Aug 13 '22

China isn’t too fond of people with dark skin, with subsaharan africans and caribbean people being singled out hard.

→ More replies

35

u/Liam81099 Aug 12 '22

There has to be some kinda catch to the methodology because if I’m not mistaken (from YouTube videos alone ofc, I’m American) Venezuela is super diverse. Like cities upon cities of mixed race people.

13

u/luisrof Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

According to 2021 data Venezuela is at 7.9%. This map is using data that's older than 20 years old.

33

u/PhillipLlerenas Aug 13 '22

I mean…so is Russia and China.

Diversity doesn’t translate to racial harmony.

7

u/Rusiano Aug 13 '22

Russia is tolerant of certain minorities, and intolerant of others.

Russians are accepting of ethnic minorities from Siberia and the Far East for example. Most of the racism is against Caucasian minorities from the south of the country.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.6k

u/Eiriel_Cheney Aug 13 '22

The fact France is the only western country in the red is hilarious to me

134

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

I worked with a old French chef from the South. He said when he was growing up, the people who lived in the next village were essentially foreigners to them.

72

u/MonsieurAuguste Aug 13 '22

Yes up until the early 20th century most of France spoke a variety of dialects and many were not inteligibile with each other.

Most people don't know much about France because everything they know about France is actually just Paris. France has four language families within its border as compared to the UK which has two.

→ More replies

27

u/Evepaul Aug 13 '22

I wonder how the question was spelled in French, because while racism is a big topic in France, any concept of human races is unlawful. Most french people do not even know what to write when immigration forms in other countries ask for "race". Statistics based on ethnicities are forbidden, and even the mention of races being equal was erased from the constitution because races aren't supposed to exist in the country in the first place.

Modern racists are mostly focused on "cultures" and "our civilization", so unless the question was asked using these terms I doubt it would be relevant to the french situation.

→ More replies

654

u/Marthaver1 Aug 13 '22

Not like France doesn’t have an incredible amount of African and Arab citizens. It’s weird to see France in red but Eastern Europe nearly blue.

756

u/SecretDevilsAdvocate Aug 13 '22

Just because they have them doesn’t necessarily mean they want them

361

u/ClivePalmersLawyer Aug 13 '22

Or the immigrants are the ones that don't want another race as neighbours.

140

u/cock_daniels Aug 13 '22

this article summarizes france quite well and in a politically tactful way: https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2012/03/30/149718871/french-muslims-ease-cultural-tensions-with-french-halal-food

from it, you can ascertain that the influx of cultural outliers has influence on markets and politics, and in a way that's close to becoming a hotbed of issues that requires some tiptoeing around. this has been simmering for at least a decade. i think we all got our first tangible taste of it with that Charlie Hebdo shooting back in 2014 maybe?

no intent to stir the pot here, though i recognize pointing out cultural tension tends to do that.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

55

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22 edited 26d ago

[deleted]

→ More replies

47

u/Rusiano Aug 13 '22

Eastern Europe isn't as bad as reddit would have you believe. Plus most Eastern European countries were part of multiethnic empires, so they are used to some degree of diversity

10

u/Purrthematician Aug 13 '22

Don't you know? When Easter Europe does something well, it's just incorrect methodology.

8

u/Jacke766565 Aug 13 '22

Exactly, historically eastern Europe is much more ethnically tolerant and accepting than France or Germany. Hasn't always been a heaven but antisemitism for example was orders of magnitude lower than in Germany or even France

→ More replies
→ More replies

121

u/Hinaloth Aug 13 '22

As a Frenchman, I must say this very sadly tracks. The xenophobia in the hexagon is growing rampant and it's really feeling stupid.

50

u/Slartibartfast39 Aug 13 '22

The hexagon? Meaning the shape of France? I'm English and this is the first time I've heard that used. Is it common?

101

u/LordMcze Aug 13 '22

It's the term used for mainland France, not including all its overseas territories.

17

u/Slartibartfast39 Aug 13 '22

Well TIL. Cheers.

→ More replies

16

u/Finkielkrautrock Aug 13 '22

It is extremely common in french/france, yes. https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexagone_(France)

6

u/Moist_Farmer3548 Aug 13 '22

Yes. I'm not French and I've heard it used quite a bit.

6

u/After_Mountain_901 Aug 13 '22

It can be hard not to have a knee jerk reaction to repeat acts of terrorism.

→ More replies

6

u/ManufacturerOk1168 Aug 13 '22

Compared to our neighbours, it's nothing. French people are fast to self-criticize, but we don't realize how crazily tolerant we are until we live elsewhere. And you don't even need to go very far, just cross the Channel or go to southern Italy.

Most people on earth hate foreigners.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

1.2k

u/EnvironmentalSun8410 Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

I wonder how they translated "race" in India or the Middle East (etc), and how it was understood. Eg the question of having someone of a different "race" doesn't even register in Saudi. A problem might be if they are from a different tribe, and certainly religion. Such loaded words have a very local, specific history and meaning that doesn't travel well.

230

u/IMeguminBestWaifu Aug 12 '22

Being from a different tribe than someone in Saudi Arabia isn’t a big deal

182

u/smartfridgeplayer Aug 13 '22

As a Saudi I have many neighbors from different tribes and no one gives a fuck lmao

87

u/Nastypilot Aug 13 '22

Genuine question: Since you're a Saudi, do you identify more in terms of nationality with the state of Saudi Arabia and the monarchy of the Al-Saud dynasty, Saudi Arabia as a state of Arabs of the Arabian Peninsula, or with your tribe, or with the place where you live? I'm sorry, as a European, I always couldn't wrap my head around things like this, where a state is not made as a state for an ethnic group/groups as is common in Europe, or around a particular ideology, but instead around a powerful monarchy.

176

u/smartfridgeplayer Aug 13 '22

Personally for me it's Muslim first, then Saudi, then tribe

We don't care about tribes as much as before but of course it depends for everyone

35

u/Nastypilot Aug 13 '22

Alright, thank you for your answer.

36

u/smartfridgeplayer Aug 13 '22

No problem and feel free to ask me anything else

66

u/DaveManchester Aug 13 '22

Where do babies come from?

17

u/Anonymouse-Doe Aug 13 '22

From storks, obviously.

16

u/smartfridgeplayer Aug 13 '22

Obviously from kissing /s

→ More replies

5

u/Inside_Walrus4392 Aug 13 '22

How is babby formed? How girl get praegnant?

8

u/smartfridgeplayer Aug 13 '22

Babby foerm wen too peepil kis

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

161

u/PeanutNSFWandJelly Aug 12 '22

“Saideman writes, "In some places, when one is asked this question, they may think of a single race, perhaps the Vietnamese think of the Chinese but not of other races. So it may not be that the people are very racist in general — they just hate one group that is defined by race." In other words, if Vietnam scored as particularly intolerant (they did), that might just be because they're less tolerant toward the race that popped into their heads first — e.g. the Chinese — than they are of other races in general.”

5

u/Siigmaa Aug 13 '22

That makes sense...I live in Vietnam and really don't get the feeling that this is an unwelcoming place at all...I can say however, there is a strong feeling here towards their northern neighbors.

→ More replies

101

u/snortincheugpills Aug 13 '22

At least we can be confident France knew what it meant lol

37

u/centrafrugal Aug 13 '22

You can't really use 'race' in French. It's really only used for breeds of animals.

21

u/Abrical Aug 13 '22

Yes contrary to english, "race" in french is only used by far right,we would prefer ethnics

→ More replies

42

u/MoriartyParadise Aug 13 '22

We never use 'race' in France, we're even taught in the standard curriculum from a young age how race is a complete non-scientific non-sensical bullshit, race is just not a thing in France

Now it does not mean xenophobia does not exist in France but it's based in cultural markers, not 'racial'. There were free black men in France before the US was still a thing, we had black generals leading the army 2 hundred years before the US stopped segregation

I don't dispute the prevalence of xenophobia in France but i have no clue how the WaPo found out "40% of french people don't want neighbours from a different race" when only a fringe nutjob part of the population would recognise "race" as a thing in the first place

But given that it's the WaPo talking about France i wouldn't be surprised if they pulled it out of their arse

17

u/Argnir Aug 13 '22

Yeah, even saying that black and white peoples are not the same race sounds really fucking weird in French. It's considered racist by definition.

7

u/ArtemisXD Aug 13 '22

I'd like to add that a black person from France's overseas territory like Guadeloupe ou la Reunion is treated differently than a black person from Mali. It's just not the same, and in my opinion It's mostly due to religion

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/Gil-GaladWasBlond Aug 13 '22

Yeah race isn't going to translate well in India. Religion? Caste? Yes. Race? No.

5

u/whatskarmaeh Aug 13 '22

Someone said the study is 22 years old. I think it should be tossed out at this point if so. 22 years ago the world was a different place and politics, ethics and even where refugees fled are completely different now.

9

u/ivix Aug 13 '22

It's ok, you can say that India is racist.

→ More replies
→ More replies

205

u/Various_Librarian750 Aug 13 '22

INDIA NUMBER ONE LET'S GOOOOOOO

→ More replies

23

u/Rope15 Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Usually these maps are not fully accurate, as a lot of the definitions or views of race are different in every country. And if you read the title it says that this much percentage of the population said they would not like other races living near them when compared to other groups.

5

u/BlueKimchi Aug 13 '22

That’s true. In a lot of East Asian countries, I assume the term “race” in a survey would be interpreted as foreign vs. non-foreign. For example, in the US people who are of English or German descent are considered to be part of the same racial group, but somewhere like Korea, they are often very discriminatory towards Chinese or Japanese people since they view them as being completely different just based on them being of foreign origin, even though they’re technically of the same race.

→ More replies
→ More replies

588

u/NinjaElectricMeteor Aug 12 '22

With an interesting article that goes indepth on how this question might be interpreted differently in different countries: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/17/5-insights-on-the-racial-tolerance-and-ethnicity-maps-from-an-ethnic-conflict-professor/

342

u/flambuoy Aug 12 '22

“Saideman writes, "In some places, when one is asked this question, they may think of a single race, perhaps the Vietnamese think of the Chinese but not of other races. So it may not be that the people are very racist in general — they just hate one group that is defined by race." In other words, if Vietnam scored as particularly intolerant (they did), that might just be because they're less tolerant toward the race that popped into their heads first — e.g. the Chinese — than they are of other races in general.”

I fail to see how this should make any difference whatsoever.

108

u/AngelKnives Aug 12 '22

I think they're trying to point out that some people might favour their own race above all others, and other people have beef with a certain country due to a war.

Person A is a white supremacist who hates all other races. Person B is not, but they are prejudice against a specific country because they warred recently.

Not saying Person B is in the right, it's just coming from a different way of thinking to Person A.

259

u/Swinight22 Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Their example was really good because Vietnam was invaded numerous times in history by China. Their relations are pretty contetious.

It's saying that some countries have historic competitiveness/hostility that might bias the answer. It's not really like Western Europe/America where you are close to your neighbours. When many countries hear "other races" they think of their neighbouring countires that their country's been in rivals with for centuries.

Just different

Edit-not saying it’s NOT racist. But it’s not “racist” in the traditional sense of the word. A lot of these countries are full of people who still remember oppressive rule under different ethnic groups (think Africa under European colonial rules, East Asia under Japan).

Race relations is an extremely complex topic. Don’t make it into a black and white issue.

82

u/starvere Aug 12 '22

If you ask Palestinians about people of another race being their neighbors they probably immediately think of violent Jewish settlers coming to confiscate their land

→ More replies
→ More replies

36

u/arkfille Aug 12 '22

It totally can make a difference, I don’t know an awful lot about vietnams history but lets say they have been historically oppressed or attacked by the Chinese, while harboring bad feelings towards the entire race because of that is not excusable it is a lot more understandable

→ More replies
→ More replies

30

u/NoJustAnotherUser Aug 13 '22

Oops - Washington Post!

That explains everything!

34

u/AdministrativeBit510 Aug 13 '22

Worse yet, the post is from 2013 and the data it is based off of is from 1982-2006.

→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/DpGoof Aug 13 '22

This is a very poor colormap, it transitions from blue to red almost immediately; which leads you to wrong conclusions because “red is bad”. Difference between the worst blue and the best red could be as small as 0.1%, or as much as 14.9%, which is 1/3 of the range in this map.

→ More replies

3.9k

u/Analyst214 Aug 12 '22 Silver

I laugh Everytime people think the US is the most racist in the world. They have never been to India, China, Japan….they would flip if a black person moved in lmao

1.5k

u/flambuoy Aug 12 '22

In Japan they flip if someone whose ancestors butchered pigs moves in.

105

u/divine_dolphin Aug 12 '22

Wait why? Japan fucking loves their pork?

186

u/DavidInPhilly Aug 13 '22

Just not pork butchers.

→ More replies

78

u/-ThisUsernameIsTaken Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

It's traditionally an "unclean" job. Like executioners or undertakers (sorry wrestling fans). Historically they were part of an "untouchable" class, meaning they were ostracized and not allowed to marry outside their caste

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burakumin

Nobody cares anymore though, the class was abolished 150 years ago and no one here asks or holds anything against those working in such industries.

→ More replies
→ More replies

211

u/NerdyLumberjack04 Aug 12 '22

But they'd get along with observant Jews and Muslims?

264

u/flambuoy Aug 12 '22

More info if you’re interested: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burakumin

156

u/Deracination Aug 12 '22

I don't understand how they even find out someone is a Burakumin to discriminate against them. Is someone keeping all these records to go around outing people?

254

u/flambuoy Aug 12 '22

Actually, yes. It used to be printed on birth certificates.

170

u/GoblinRightsNow Aug 12 '22

There are also records of villages where they were forced to live and the family names of the people who lived there. These records were being quietly sold on the black market so people could check people's heritage before making a job offer or agreeing to a marriage.

82

u/flambuoy Aug 12 '22

Thats right. Discrimination continues, though it is supposed to be illegal.

38

u/Moistfruitcake Aug 12 '22

But it's specific to the descendants of pig farmers, what the fuck is that?

Isn't almost everyone the descendant of a pig farmer at some point?

40

u/DavidInPhilly Aug 13 '22

No, they have a bunch of ‘unclean’ jobs that equates to an untouchable like caste position.

→ More replies

10

u/AlexSSB Aug 13 '22

Jesus

The lengths people are prepared to go to find out whether they should hate their new neighbor, based on ancestry

→ More replies
→ More replies

37

u/WikiMobileLinkBot Aug 12 '22

Desktop version of /u/flambuoy's link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burakumin


[opt out] Beep Boop. Downvote to delete

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

662

u/pjm8786 Aug 12 '22

Realistically the US is the second largest multiracial democracy in the world. Issues of race were always going to come up in America before most other places. We may not be the most interpersonally racist society but we do have the most well documented struggle with it in the world. I think that probably drives a lot of the assumptions

162

u/Wumple_doo Aug 12 '22

Odd question what’s the largest? Is it India or something I’m curious?

507

u/BlazedKC Aug 12 '22

Yes it’s India. Imagine if the entirety of Europe was one country. That’s essentially how it is with India with its numerous official language and regional languages ranging from Hindi, to Tamil, and Malayalam, Bengali, and Urdu. Not to mention there’s so many different cultural groups with its own heritage, traditions, etc.

274

u/ReadinII Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

I would say the ethnic differences in India are even larger than Europe. Europe was mostly Christian and the significant minority that wasn’t still had a religion that was close in origin to Christianity. Nearly all Europeans speak a language in the Indo-European family (Romance, Germanic or Slavic and smaller but still significant Celtic and Greek). India has far more diverse religions and languages. Those are just two markers for culture.

73

u/Ch0ng0B0ng0 Aug 13 '22

Yeah Catholics and Protestants were famously peaceful…..

14

u/RelaxedConvivial Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

In Belfast you have very divided communities between Catholics and Protestants separated by 100's of 'Peace Walls'. It can take you a bit aback when visiting. You will know very easily if you are in an Irish area or a British area by all the flags and murals.

And unfortunately it is religion that perpetuates this divide. Because you go to school for your religion so all your friends are from 'your side'. Things have become much less violent thankfully but that underlying hatred is still there especially with politics.

I honestly think if all schools were mixed it could help normalise relations more than any other policy.

12

u/divertough Aug 13 '22

I believe it's less of a religious hatred but more of the religion shows which side your on politically. So why it may be referred to as "Catholics vs Protestants" it's more of a "nationalists vs loyalist" feud.

→ More replies

106

u/DryDrunkImperor Aug 12 '22

There has been a lot of strife in Europe because people were the wrong kind of Christian though.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

124

u/energizerbottle Aug 12 '22

The new world, and especially countries like US and Canada is where multicultural just has to work. Imo they represent the best idealized ‘future’ where people work together regardless of their background.

Obviously it doesn’t work as well as we’d want to, but it works a hell of a lot better than anywhere else!

53

u/jaymickef Aug 12 '22

We’re finally realizing in Canada it doesn’t just happen on its own, multiculturalism needs a little help. So we have a long way to go but as you say, it has to work.

70

u/myhipsi Aug 12 '22

Multiculturalism is fine but people must share the same/similar values. This is important. If immigrants don't share your values, tensions will rise.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

106

u/Polandgod75 Aug 12 '22

Yeah with Japan and China, my response to that “are you sure about that?”or “yeah totally”. Atleast India and South Korea are more honest about it.

198

u/Czar_Petrovich Aug 12 '22

Yea the Japanese answers to this were only provided by the youth or they're fronting. Japan is xenophobic af and people will make up anything from "They won't understand how to use our complex recycling and waste management system" to "no foreigners allowed in this apartment complex" and everything in-between veiled mental gymnastics to blatant, casual racism.

I've lived there. They stare. It's perfectly legal to deny housing based on the fact that you are a foreigner.

122

u/SteelAlchemistScylla Aug 12 '22

I’ve been told by a friend who used to live in Japan that “America has its problems, its certainly not ideal, but at the end of the day you are an American. You will never be Japanese.”

80

u/Czar_Petrovich Aug 12 '22

Yeah you could be anyone other than Japanese, have been born in Japan, and speak Japanese as a first language fluently, to where nobody could tell the difference, and you are still a foreigner.

→ More replies

44

u/Academic_Signal_3777 Aug 13 '22

God this reminds me of three little girls I used to know. There mother was born and raised in Japan, but she moved to America and married a white American man. She taught each of her daughters Japanese and they loved their Japanese culture. Every summer they would take a long vacation to Japan to see their cousins. One year, the oldest was extremely exited to go and talked about it nonstop. I was so happy for her and her sisters. But when I saw her again after the trip? She had the saddest look on her face and she wouldn’t talk to me about the trip. The younger sister then filled me in: she went back to Japan and was picked on constantly for being a biracial American. Even her cousins would pick on her for having an American accent and for not looking Japanese. It broke my heart seeing her rejected by her own family like that.

4

u/cpMetis Aug 13 '22

Pretty much.

The vast majority of Americans will say you can "become" American. The most liberal of Japanese might accept you as pseudo-japanese-ish if you're lucky.

→ More replies

49

u/The_Canterbury_Tail Aug 12 '22

Don't forget "foreigners will just take off back to their own countries without paying any rent so I won't rent to them. No the fact they're using a guarantor company doesn't change my mind."

→ More replies

81

u/HegemonNYC Aug 12 '22

One of my friends in Japan was of Korean descent. She was born in Japan. Her parents were born in Japan. Her grandparents were kidnapped and enslaved in Korea and brought to Japan. She didn’t speak Korean and had never been there. Despite this, she was a Korean citizen only, and wasn’t allowed to be Japanese. She had to go to the Korean embassy in Osaka to get her passport, from a country she’d never been to.

And that is Korea, a neighbor with shared ethnic background and language (although the Japanese won’t admit that). Imagine being black or white

18

u/the-magic-box Aug 12 '22

How do they have a shared language? My understanding was that there is no solid evidence that Japanese and Korean have a common ancestor.

10

u/Logalog9 Aug 13 '22

The languages converged a lot during the colonial period from shared loanwords, but at their core they're totally unrelated.

→ More replies

12

u/Logalog9 Aug 13 '22

Zainich aren't prevented from being Japanese, it's just that Japan doesn't recognize dual nationalities, which discourages a lot of zainichi from naturalizing. It's still a problem though.

→ More replies

36

u/Czar_Petrovich Aug 12 '22

I tried not to mention Koreans, given the animosity between the two cultures, but you're absolutely right. These two hate each other more than any other two groups of people from the far east. Which, is pretty interesting considering how almost indistinguishable their genetics are from one another. On paper looking at DNA they're practically the same. It's awful how history has unfolded between the two.

If nobody had ever told anyone your friend was Korean by descent, not one person in Japan would be able to tell the difference. It's a shame.

17

u/zack77070 Aug 13 '22

Animosity is mostly from the older generations that still remember the war or directly grew up with someone who did. Nowadays there are so many Koreans that are into anime and Japanese kids that love BTS that it's not that bad.

4

u/Czar_Petrovich Aug 13 '22

This is good to know, I appreciate you saying that, it makes me smile.

→ More replies

15

u/DXXTHGOD Aug 12 '22

She could’ve gotten citizenship easily she probably just chose not to. A lot of zainichi chose not to naturalize as a way to preserve their identity.

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/Alarod Aug 12 '22

It's not much better online. I have seen people outright be avoided for stating they are a foreigner and using a translator.

→ More replies
→ More replies

259

u/CheeseIsAHypothesis Aug 12 '22

It's because racist behavior blows up in U.S. media, so it looks like it's everywhere. When, if it were a racist country, racism would be so normalized that it'd never make the news.

America is also one of the most diverse countries in the world, so there's naturally always going to be more racial conflict.

74

u/jaymickef Aug 12 '22

And someday there’s going to be less. America went through a lot of years of slavery and Jim Crow and hasn’t been out it that long. You’re right, issues blow up that wouldn’t in other places because people have high standards and are still working towards making them the reality.

35

u/CheeseIsAHypothesis Aug 12 '22

Exactly. We still have a long way to go and the standards are only getting higher and they should be, reasonably. But I do think more people should be aware of just how diverse and racially inclusive America is. I hear too many people talking about how behind we are compared to Europe. In some areas it's debatable, but not racially. That's one reason that so many people from all over the globe want to move here.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

34

u/Vlory Aug 12 '22

I lived in a ski resort in Canada for a few years and last week was the first I saw a black person in years

all the shop keepers and all the locals were being super nice and asking him questions about where was he from, what did he do etc.

I was a few stores away and kinda stared and thought to myself if I have turned racist? I’m not exactly trying to treat other races differently it just amazes me about where you grew up could affect your view

imagine not seeing another race until you are a teenager?

18

u/lazylaunda Aug 13 '22

I hope other people see this and realise there is nothing inherently wrong with staring.

Babies stare, animals stare. It's basic human design. We see something new, we stare.

People are so racist towards other countries like India, Bangladesh etc. They say we have a staring problem. A villagers who has seen only people from his village will stare at a white or black person. It's only natural.

In a tourist city like Jaipur, where I am currently, I don't see happening because people are used to seeing tourists.

→ More replies

3

u/miku_dominos Aug 13 '22

I grew up in a small town of 6,000 and we had 100 or so people who weren't of Anglo descent. My first time in a major city at age 20 was a real eye opener.

→ More replies

126

u/CitizenJustin Aug 12 '22

They’ve never been to France. I felt more uncomfortable there than anywhere in the US.

→ More replies

83

u/tamagoyakiisgood Aug 12 '22

I remember some Redditor arguing with me that the US is the most racist country in the world, then sending a link to back up his claim, saying that US tops the most racist country list. The link was a list of the least racist countries, US was number one.

It happened more than a year ago, but it's still incredibly funny to me.

→ More replies
→ More replies

261

u/wulfgang14 Aug 12 '22

Pakistan seems really tolerant on this map.

126

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

Pakistanis are Pan-Islamists. The only thing they care about is being a Sunni Muslim.

33

u/Anonymouse-Doe Aug 13 '22

The only thing they care about is being Muslim. Doesn't matter Shia or Sunni.

→ More replies

47

u/ValidStatus Aug 13 '22

The only thing they care about is being a Sunni Muslim.

20% of Pakistanis are Shia.

→ More replies
→ More replies

184

u/ValidStatus Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 12 '22 Helpful Wholesome Shocked

Pakistan is pretty multi-ethnic with the only thing keeping the different groups together being religion, if it weren't tolerant of other races then it would disintegrate into at least five different countries.

(All links are images):

Throughout history, the Indus region has had so many invading and migrating people, as it stands right in between West, Central, and South Asia that it has resulted in the very distinct looking ethnic groups in Pakistan. You could see a local Pakistani who might look like they're from Europe, China, and even some who are in fact from Africa.

Like the Hazara people, who are said to be descendants of Ghengis Khan, and look slightly East Asian.

The Pashtun people Pakistan's second-largest ethnic group, an Iranic ethnic group that was historically referred to as Afghans.

The Siddi people, who came from West Africa with the British Empire.

The Kalash people The smallest group in Pakistan. About 3,000 to 5,000 people who live in remote valleys which are almost entirely cut off from the rest of the country.

The Kashmiri people They live in Pakistan's North-East, though only a small number of them reside in Azad Kashmir on the Pakistani side of the LOC, most of them are in Indian administered Kashmir.

The Baloch people They reside in the rough and sparsely populated Balochistan region.

The Burusho people. They live in the Northern regions of Gilgit Baltistan which joined Pakistan after the local people rebelled against Maharaja Hari Singh, the ruler of the princely state of Jammu & Kashmir.

The Punjabi people, the largest ethnic group in Pakistan. Residing in the land of the "Five Rivers" which they get their name from since the bulk of their population live in settlements around the Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi, Beas, and Sutlej rivers.

The Sindhi people, native to Sindh in the South of Pakistan where the Indus river ends, with most of their population being around the river itself.

The Seraiki people, somewhat seen as a result of Punjabi and Sindhi interaction.

All of these groups are linguistically and culturally unique with their own traditions, values, heritage and history.

And even this list above isn't all of the local ones.

Apart from dozens more local ethnicities there have been many refugees since Pakistan's creation, from Muhajirs (Refugees) that came from India to Biharis, Bengalis of what is now Bangladesh, Rohingyans, Uhyghurs, Bosnians during the '90s, a tiny number of Arab refugees as the middle east became unstable.

50

u/Pleasant_Jim Aug 12 '22

Would love to hear an interview from a Bosnian or middle Eastern person that spent a lot of time there and carries on living there.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

133

u/samjp910 Aug 12 '22

Apparently, only Indians are honest.

/s

50

u/Organtrefficker Aug 13 '22

More like naive, you can walk up to my mother and she'll explain to you in detail why she hates every other race culture religion region language planet galaxy whatever

→ More replies

11

u/multi_tasker01 Aug 13 '22

Lmfao..

Underrated comment

→ More replies

348

u/mysticmiah Aug 12 '22

W Americas

131

u/samrequireham Aug 12 '22

This hemisphere is kicking ass

→ More replies

52

u/Daimakku1 Aug 13 '22

Americas: 1

Asian/European continent: 0

24

u/poonslyr69 Aug 13 '22

Usually it’s called Eurasia

→ More replies
→ More replies

51

u/Meior Aug 12 '22 Helpful

Maybe this is a language thing, but to me it's incredibly weird to say 'different race' about humans from another part of the world or a different skin colour.

→ More replies

9

u/Buffalolife420 Aug 13 '22

But...but.....America is so racist?!?

424

u/ScottieP_ Aug 12 '22

This is going to go well. Let me grab some popcorn to watch these comments for a bit.

101

u/Recymen12 Aug 12 '22

nah not really, no surprises here.

it is sad that it is only countrywise and not deeper wich would be more insightful.

62

u/Abestar909 Aug 12 '22

This is such a Reddit comment

19

u/Moistfruitcake Aug 12 '22

They missed out "I'm sorting by controversial" for a reddit full house.

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/Trumpspenis123 Aug 13 '22

Indians be races

44

u/VE2NCG Aug 12 '22

Strange, all my neighbours all around are all from the same race… the human race 🤔

9

u/Dachu77 Aug 13 '22

I hate my neighbours cuz they are a different race, i have a fuckin xenomorph as a neighbour, don't tell me to be tolerant about him

5

u/[deleted] Aug 13 '22

Finally a sane comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

51

u/The_Canterbury_Tail Aug 12 '22

But what were the other options? This percentage means nothing if we don't know what the other options were that they found less objectionable. If it was just Meth Dealers and mad cat people, it's a different story to single mothers and the manager of a garden centre.

9

u/stares_at_rain Aug 12 '22

Also can't tell whether it was a "choose one" or a "check all that apply" type question.

→ More replies

14

u/cbusick137 Aug 12 '22

I had to scroll way too far down to find this question being asked.

→ More replies

148

u/AtebYngNghymraeg Aug 12 '22

Yay for UK! (For a change!)

113

u/sniper989 Aug 12 '22

The UK is always ranked the most welcoming country in Europe for immigrants, contrary to what some of the newspapers or social media personalities may tell you!

61

u/zapolight Aug 13 '22

I've studied abroad in Germany and the UK, absolutely felt welcome in the UK. All of my best friends are there now. But I was always an outsider in Germany.

→ More replies
→ More replies

63

u/MoreGarlicBread Aug 12 '22

Ive left the UK now for many reasons, but one thing I miss is the people. I think the casualness/calmness/kindness of the English people is something that's very hard to find anywhere else

(I say English because that's only where I lived)

→ More replies

647

u/Fl_lifee Aug 12 '22

Americans are not as racist as some make them out to be.

828

u/[deleted] Aug 12 '22

To be fair Americans on the internet are obsessed with Race and identity to an unhealthy level, mostly because normal people are usually outside, touching grass, not on reddit.

264

u/The_Canterbury_Tail Aug 12 '22

And America in general is a little obsessed with pigeonholing people. Everyone has to fit into a particular box. African American, Italian American, Irish American etc. And this box is determined by your ancestors who came to the new world 8 generations ago, but you still fit into that box.

73

u/TDixPix Aug 12 '22

Totally - saying I'm a third generation Canadian has no bearing for some people. I've always been of the belief that if you've never been there and can't speak the language, there's probably an easier cultural identifier to use - hint: it's where you are.

23

u/Derp_Wellington Aug 12 '22

If I get in some kind of trouble in a foreign country I'm 100% Canadian. What am I going to do? Call up the Dutch embassy and be like, "Hey, my great great grandfather lived there like 100 years ago, can you guys get me out of this jam?"

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/LikelyNotSober Aug 13 '22

The U.S. is a country of immigrants with quite a bit of racial diversity.

Historically, there’s been a lot of racial inequity, and we are acutely aware of that. Things are not perfect, people still have prejudices, but most Americans are not racist, and don’t have a problem with living near, working with, and being friends with people of different races or backgrounds.

Usually people who are outwardly racist are older, rural, and/or less educated.

181

u/[deleted] Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

[deleted]

94

u/Physical-Order Aug 12 '22

Europe goes to the 1939 when you mention the Romani

32

u/postalraccoon Aug 13 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Europeans: America is so racist

Me: What about the Romani?

Europeans: THAT’S DIFFERENT!!!

→ More replies
→ More replies

29

u/EnvironmentalSun8410 Aug 12 '22

What Europeans are you talking about, from your experience?

82

u/[deleted] Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

83

u/leofntes Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 13 '22

Seems like the new world (the Americas and Australia/NZ) acts literally as a newer world

33

u/Jeffery95 Aug 13 '22

Modern society in the new world formed recently from people who were mostly lower class and persecuted in the old world. It makes a difference when you can start fresh.

→ More replies
→ More replies

14

u/ThatGuyMaulicious Aug 13 '22

Oh look UK ain't racists.

→ More replies

102

u/5m1tm Aug 12 '22 edited Aug 16 '22 Silver Helpful

Firstly, idk how they've defined "race" here. It's a concept that doesn't make sense outside of Western societies. It doesn't make sense even in a Western society lol. In Asian countries, race isn't a concept that exists. Divisions are on the basis of other things such as along religious/secterian, ethnic/cultural, classist and linguistic lines etc.

In India, there are definitely rigid divisions primarily on the basis of caste, religion, language and class. People usually live beside (and marry with) those from similar backgrounds and that's how the average Indian residential areas/communities are, even though there are no segregation laws and even though laws which prohibit caste and religious discrimination, do exist. Same goes for languages. People usually prefer living with those who speak their language, or related languages. Race however, is not a concept Indian people use.

That's the kind of diversity India has. It sounds very weird if you look at it from a "melting pot" kind of perspective that the West thinks from. But it makes complete sense if you look at it as a voluntary and informal system adopted by the different communities/peoples of India so as to retain their own identity and let others keep theirs within their own community. I'm ofc not saying that what's happening right now is good/right, but India is like a continent in terms of most socio-political parameters. I cannot stress that enough. It's a huge country both in terms of land area and population, and has numerous languages, religions and cultures. Expecting all of them to seamlessly blend in like a melting pot, is an idealistic dream. It doesn't translate to real life results (although I hope that one day it does). The other thing is that most of India is either villages and small towns, which is where these divisions are more rigid, whereas in the case of Western countries, majority of the country is urban (which is where the "melting pot" system exists).

The only times these social identity markers cease to matter much (in India atleast), are if people are residing in posh urban areas or in very poor urban or poor rural areas, because in the posh areas, the class status is enough to give you a free paas into that section of society, and in the very poor areas, you don't have any choice but to co-operate and live together, and so they all live together. It's tragic, beautiful and profound all at the same time, that the two times social identities mostly cease to matter (in India atleast), are when you're either pretty rich or pretty poor. These are the areas where the "melting pot" culture exists.

Plus, in most schools and workplaces, people from different socio-political-economic backgrounds do indeed study and work together, just like how it is in Western countries.

I hope that all the people here in the comments section, who were arguing about India (this includes the supporters and critics), read this comment and realise the nuanced point I tried to make.

(Also, I'm an Indian myself).

→ More replies

4

u/Open-Function6767 Aug 12 '22

Damn Venezuela the only non blue in the Americas

6

u/noorandapples Aug 13 '22

But how many lied to save face in front of the interviewer?

46

u/Exleose Aug 12 '22

France 😎

38

u/benazeer90 Aug 13 '22

India 😎😎

28

u/Exleose Aug 13 '22

💪🇫🇷✖️🇮🇳💪

→ More replies
→ More replies

100

u/_marcoos Aug 12 '22

France, WTF?

139

u/BlitzSirens Aug 12 '22

It's probably a combination of reasons, immigrant ethnic groups from country's (red) might have an aversion to it anywhere, they are probably settling in larger cities. Where-as the native French living in less dense cities or rural areas see Paris full of immigrants and perceive a threat, given the series of extremist attacks the country has suffered. Then again I'm not an expert, just speculating.

→ More replies

119

u/El_Bistro Aug 12 '22

You ever been to France?

→ More replies

37

u/wysuszony Aug 12 '22

How to say you've never been to big city in France without saying you've never been to big city in France.

9

u/_marcoos Aug 12 '22

True, the only somewhat francophone countries I've been to are Belgium, Switzerland and Canada. :)

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

40

u/That-Guy59 Aug 12 '22

I thought Japan would be worse than China and Korea

→ More replies

56

u/CellLow7797 Aug 12 '22

Question: I really enjoy this sub, but what is the source I do for these maps? Is the data accurate?

9

u/Az1234er Aug 13 '22

Apparently the data comes from https://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/WVSOnline.jsp?WAVE=6%26COUNTRY=875&WAVE=6%26COUNTRY=875

The results are somewhat strange France is at 22.2 % on their 2005-2009 survey and 3.7% on their 2017-2020 survey. A difference this big does not inspire confidence

39

u/Lemoniusz Aug 12 '22

... You literally have it at the bottom right

→ More replies

56

u/CitizenJustin Aug 12 '22

Humanity really needs to grow up. It’s time.

→ More replies

5

u/magnesiumb Aug 13 '22

Race absolutely needed to be defined in the question, just looking at my own country on this map. I know exactly why it's the color it is and the person they had in mind is probably the same color as them, lmao.

4

u/STB_64 Aug 13 '22

Indians:

6

u/sin314 Aug 13 '22

Israel would probably be like 50%+